Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: WaterTower to Release 'Kong: Skull Island'

Soundtrack News - Za, 25/02/2017 - 02:00
WaterTower Music today announced the March 3 release of the soundtrack to [m.41746]Kong: Skull Island[] – the Warner Bros. Pictures, Legendary Pictures and Tencent Pictures film that reimagines the origins of one of the most powerful monster myths of all time. Directed by Jordan Vogt Roberts, the film will be released worldwide in 2D, 3D in select theatres, and IMAX beginning March 10, 2017. Composer [c.1480]Henry Jackman[] ([m.31502]X-Men: First Class[], [m.33892]Captain America: The Winter Soldier[], [m.38137]Captain America: Civil War[], the [m.30723]Kick-Ass[] films) created the film's lush symphonic score. His music highlights Kong's emotional connection with some of the characters by giving specific moments in the score what he says is "a bit of humanity and sensitivity. The...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Weekly Roundup: February 24

Soundtrack News - Za, 25/02/2017 - 02:00
Announced this week were new composer assignments for [c.1099]Chris Hajian[] ([m.48658]LAbyrinth[]), [c.2113]Fil Eisler[] ([m.46920]Life of the Party[]), [c.1259]Jeff Cardoni[] ([m.48660]Status Update[]), among many others. For the full list of composer and music supervisor assignments from this week, [url./composers/]click here[]. Over 30 new soundtrack albums were released this week. [da.2017-02-20]Click here for the full schedule[]. Opening nationwide this week is (with music by): [m.43170]Collide[] ([c.1422]Ilan Eshkeri[]), [m.47476]Get Out[] ([c.20877]Michael Abels[]) and [m.43412]Rock Dog[] ([c.401]Rolfe Kent[]). Among all new theatrical releases, we are tracking song credits for: - [m.43170]Collide[] (12 songs) - [m.47476]Get Out[] (3 songs) -...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Back Lot Music to Release 'Get Out' Soundtrack

Soundtrack News - Do, 23/02/2017 - 02:00
Back Lot Music will release the [a.20182]Get Out – Original Motion Picture Soundtrack[] digitally on February 24, 2017, it was announced today. Best known for combining classical music with African-American jazz, blues, bluegrass and ethnic genres, [c.20877]Michael Abels[] was asked by writer/director/producer Jordan Peele to compose the music for the thriller. "Jordan gave me very clear direction for this score," said Abels. "He said that above all, it needed to be 'seriously scary.' That's hard to misinterpret!" Peele had reached out to Abels after watching a YouTube video of Urban Legends, one of Abels' classical compositions. "He said it needed to have some distinctly African-American elements without relying on stereotypes, quite literally wanting African-American voices to be...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: IM Global Music to Release 'Collide' Score

Soundtrack News - Wo, 22/02/2017 - 02:00
IM Global Music, the music and publishing soundtrack subsidiary of thriving independent studio IM Global, will digitally release the original feature score by [c.1422]Ilan Eshkeri[] ([m.30723]Kick-Ass[], [m.29303]Stardust[], [m.32018]The Young Victoria[]) from the motion picture [m.43170]Collide[] on February 24th. While writing music for the film, Eshkeri suggested using only analog synthesizers – a bold and unique creative choice. The score is a technical achievement using many synthesizers not usually found in soundtracks in such quantities. The synths used in the score are the Minimoog, Juno-6, Korg MS-20, PPG-Wave, and the Arturia Minibrute. "When the Director Eran asked me to do the music for the film, I didn't want to do another traditional action movie score, so I said that...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Weekly Roundup: February 17

Soundtrack News - Za, 18/02/2017 - 02:00
[c.231]John Williams[] took home his 23rd Grammy Award last Sunday for his music to [m.35727]Star Wars: The Force Awakens[] and [c.19905]Justin Timberlake[], Max Martin & Shellback won the award for the song "Can't Stop the Feeling" from [m.35217]Trolls[]. For the full story, [url./news/article/?id=2307]click here[]. [c.2205]Justin Hurwitz[] won the British Academy Film Award (BAFTA) on Sunday for his music to [m.43740]La La Land[]. [url./news/article/?id=2306]Click here[] for more information. Announced this week were new composer assignments for [c.139]Mark Mothersbaugh[] ([m.41250]The LEGO Ninjago Movie[]), [c.147]David Newman[] ([m.46504]Girls Trip[]), [c.2269]Ludwig Goransson[] ([m.48613]Death Wish[]), among many others. For the full list of composer and music...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

Penka Kouneva Studios proudly presents TWO MASTER CLASSES

Film Music Magazine News - Do, 16/02/2017 - 02:37

Designed for early-career media composers, orchestrators, composer assistants, interns, recent graduates, and all interested.

CULTIVATING a CAREER & ARTIST GROWTH for media composers

Saturday, MARCH 4, 2-6 PM

ORCHESTRATION and MIDI TRANSCRIPTION

Saturday, March 11, 2-5 PM

The classes will take place in Los Angeles but will also be videotaped and released online in late March. Info below.

DESCRIPTION

CULTIVATING a CAREER & ARTIST GROWTH for media composers
Saturday, MARCH 4, 2-6 PM,
at the Courtyard-Marriott (Brentwood Conference Room),
15433 Ventura Blvd (at Hwy 405), Sherman Oaks, CA 91403

Hours 1 and 2:

• Why is it vital to write unique, distinctive music for film, TV and games
• How to get scoring jobs in film and games
• How to stay relevant to your contacts and grow your client base
• How to get top industry professionals to actually listen to your demo
• The self-teaching composer: methodology of reading orchestral scores
• The self-teaching composer: methodology of film score analysis (harmony, form, thematic development, emotional arc, arrangement, style, aesthetics)
• “In betweeb jobs” – composing self-designed assignments, and expanding one’s skill set
• How to compose masterful and imaginative music when bound by a temp score and “temp love”
• Q and A

Hours 3 and 4:

DEMO CRITIQUE of 24 curated tracks submitted by the attendees
All are invited to submit one track only, however my team and I will select and curate 24 tracks that lend themselves to most substantial learning and discussion for the entire class.

The tracks (mp3s) will be played anonymously (by my assistant) to ensure unbiased critique / discussion. I will offer constructive suggestions and honest feedback. You will understand how directors, producers, reviewers, music supervisors, other composers “hear” and perceive your demo. During my 18 years in Hollywood I have heard over 5000 demo CDs by aspiring and working composers and have observed firsthand how directors and producers listen and respond to composers’ pitches. I’ve also been married to a music editor for 14 years who listens to one soundtrack every morning (that’s about 5100 film and game soundtacks).

PRE-REQUISITE: Reading Penka’s Six Blogs on Cultivating a Career published online by Designing Music Now (free content). Upon registration, you will receive the links for reading.
DEMO CRITIQUE.

If you like to submit a demo for consideration: By submitting a demo, you agree that your composition will be presented and discussed publicly, although your name will not be mentioned. Email one track (mp3) file, with duration between 1:00 and 1:40 to penkakouneva[at]earthlink.net with the subject: MASTER CLASS DEMO CRITIQUE.

Please remove paddy intros, vamps, etc. The focus of the critique will be on how memorable is your theme and “sound” are, thematic development, form, production, arrangement, and cinematic / emotional arc.

The Demo Critique is limited to 24 tracks only. Please submit only mp3. No videos.

Intended audience.
Early-career and aspiring media composers, orchestrators, composer assistants, interns, recent graduates, and all others interested.

COST AND REGISTRATION.
The cost is $70 per Master Class (All class materials are included.) The space is limited and the class will fill up fast.
Send payment via PayPal to penkakouneva@earthlink.net
Be sure to write in the PayPal memo: “CAREER MASTER CLASS” or “ORCHESTRATION MASTER CLASS” and your email
(Or email if you’d like to mail a check.)

INTERNATIONAL COMPOSERS.
For all colleagues unable to attend in person:
The Master Classes will be professionally filmed and made available online to all interested, via Wu Si. Estimated date of release: Late March.
If interested, please sign up at contact@wusinonprofit.org or check Wu Si’s website for updates (wusinonprofit.org/penka)

————————————————————————————-

ORCHESTRATION and MIDI transcription
Saturday, March 11, 2-5 PM,
Location TBA depending on enrollment

This 3-hour Master Class will examine the workflow, challenges, and best practices of a media orchestrator in Hollywood. It will demonstrate the skill set required for transcribing MIDI mock-ups into a Finale or Sibelius score, be it for 5 instruments or 125.

We will examine:
• workflow & procedures for error-free MIDI transcription and flawless scores from MIDI
• rethinking the MIDI for live ensemble
• orchestration techniques (balance, voicing, mass, texture)
• the difference in orchestration for film, TV, games, trailers

Intended Audience:
early- and mid-career composer assistants, orchestrators, media composers. A zipped Folder of MIDI files, scores, list of textbooks, methodologies for score analysis, blogs, and study materials will be given to all attendees.

PREREQUISITE: Some experience with transcribing MIDI sequences into a professional score for live musicians.

COST AND REGISTRATION.
The cost is $70 per Master Class (All class materials are included.)
Send payment via PayPal to penkakouneva@earthlink.net
Be sure to put in the PayPal memo: CAREER MASTER CLASS or ORCHESTRATION MASTER CLASS and your email
(Or email if you’d like to mail a check)

INTERNATIONAL COMPOSERS.
For all colleagues unable to attend in person:
The Master Classes will be professionally filmed and made available online to all interested, via Wu Si. Estimated date of release: Late March.
If interested, please sign up at contact@wusinonprofit.org or check Wu Si’s website for updates (wusinonprofit.org/penka)

© 2017 by Penka Kouneva Studios

About Penka Kouneva:
Penka Kouneva (composer: Prince of Persia, Transformers games with Steve Jablonsky) is a Sundance Composer Fellow and winner of the 2015 Game Audio Network Guild’s Recognition Award. She scored 20 indie features, including the breakout features of Chloe Moretz and Josh Duhamel. She has released two orchestral albums receiving 5-star national press (The Woman Astronaut, on Varese Sarabande, and A Warrior’s Odyssey, on Sumthing Else Music). Her latest scoring job is Heroes and Legends (Astronaut Hall of Fame) at the Kennedy Space Center. She is known in Hollywood as an “exquisite talent,” an industry leader, and one of the hardest working professionals.

During the last decade while raising her family, Penka became a top studio orchestrator for films (Transformers, Matrix, Pirates 3; Lead Orchestrator on Ninja Turtles 2, Elysium, Ender’s Game, Need for Speed) and biggest games (Gears of War 2, 3, Sony’s Bloodborne, all Blizzard games – Overwatch, World of Warcraft, StarCraft II, Diablo III; Sims, Dragon Age 2. As an extraordinary mentor and lead orchestrator Penka has been instrumental in nurturing the careers of many rising talents who have continued to work on studio films, top TV shows, games and trailers.

Born and raised in Bulgaria, Penka was classically trained and received the first-ever Ph.D. in composition from Duke University. In 1999, Penka arrived in Hollywood with one computer, one contact and small savings. In the following decade, she made history as the first woman lead orchestrator on studio blockbusters since Shirley Walker . Penka is passionate about artist growth as she believes that development of one’s voice and mastery (along with cultivating relationships), is the prerequisite for success in today’s overcrowded media scoring business.

Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

Interview with Benjamin Wallfisch

Film Music Magazine News - Wo, 15/02/2017 - 05:28

Madness and the curse of centuries-old grotesqueries have rarely been as elegantly conveyed as “A Cure for Wellness,” an auspicious entry into the time-honored genre of the sane man trapped in an insane asylum – or in this case a Swiss Alps spa seemingly dedicated to the spiritual, and physical health of its decrepit well-healed clientele. Much like a funeral director with obsessive detail to make an unholy mess spic and span, “Pirates of the Caribbean” and “Ring” director Gore Verbinski has ensured that his institute resounds with old world, aristocratic class, all the better to hide the demonic suffering its delightfully twisted fairy tale is constructed upon. Leave it to British composer Benjamin Wallfisch to construct “Wellness’” castle-like foundations upon sturdily beautiful thematic melody. Given a chilling, waif-like voice to spin hypnotic suspense from, Wallfisch’s dazzlingly creepy score is the waltzing, singsong and ragingly mad stuff that classic nightmares are built upon, grandly abetting Verbinski’s cheeky homage to all things Mario Bava, Hammer Horror and passive-aggressive snobbery.

Much as its antihero stumbles upon one astounding wonder after the next while ferreting out a most reluctant executive, as well as a mysteriously sheltered waif, “A Cure For Wellness” continues Wallfisch’s pilgrim’s progress through no end of creative opportunities. Having started as an orchestrator and conductor for Dario Marianelli on the likes of “The Brothers Grimm,” and “V for Vendetta,” Wallfisch made his scoring debut with the gun-obsessed American teens of the Lars Von Trier-produced “Dear Wendy.” Using eccentric rhythms to help “The Escapist,” tunnel out of prison, Wallfisch next heard historical adventure both epic and psychedelic with “Conquest 1492” and “Hammer of the Gods.” He’d excelled with the tunefully evocative human drama of “Hours” and “Pressure,” where the settings of “Bhopal” and “Desert Dancer” let him explore a striking rhythmic mixture of East and West, Recently, his blending of soul and science proved the brilliant equation for a teaming with Pharrell Williams and Hans Zimmer on the Golden Globe nominated score to “Hidden Figures.”

But as of late, Wallfisch is swiftly becoming a go-to ghost whisperer, a voyage begun with “The Thirteenth Tale” and “The Enfield Haunting” (an allegedly true story that served as grist for “The Conjuring 2”). With his seat-jumping talents unleashed in Hollywood with the brightness-averse she-demon of “Lights Out,” Blumhouse berserkness will continue when Wallfisch takes on the killer doll of “Annabelle 2.” Yet for fans of classic, blazingly gothic scores, Wallfisch’s “A Cure for Wellness” will fix what ails them when It seems that unabashed, horror score melody is increasingly being straight jacketed. For refined subtlety and electroshock thrills have rarely danced with such devilish delight as they do in this grand ballroom of fiendishly refinished delights.


You’ve dealt with characters being trapped in claustrophobic situations in scores like “Hours” and “Pressure,” as well as going through catastrophic odysseys in “Hammer of the Gods” and “Bhopal.” How do you think scores like that set you up for “A Cure For Wellness?”

“A Cure For Wellness” is without doubt the most extraordinary, visceral, uncompromising and beautiful movies I’ve worked on to date, and is completely unique both in terms of its storytelling and central message. So whilst every score does in some ways set you up for the next one in terms of constantly refining your writing, I don’t think anything could have truly prepared for the incredible and inspiring journey I went on with Gore for this movie.

Could you talk about collaboration with Gore on “Wellness?” What was your own plunge into operatic darkness like, and how far did it push you as a composer?

It was an extraordinary and fulfilling yearlong process, starting with a waltz to be played on set for the actors to dance to. Soon after that I moved into Gore’s cutting rooms. We spent the next 6-7 months or so crafting the score together. It was a true collaboration, and wonderful to be so close to all the other filmmakers. The editors, sound designers, VFX supervisors, producers, Gore and myself were all under the same roof, working closely together and sharing ideas. I felt like I was being guided by Gore’s genius to discover musical concepts and sounds that I never knew even existed. He would give me vivid and compelling concepts, such as the ones he includes in the album’s liner notes: “There is a sickness inside all of us. A sense of the inevitable. A dark spot on the X-ray of our conscience…The disease is an unseen force, pulling the camera down a long corridor and the protagonist towards his epiphany. It promises absolution but leaves a bitter taste in the back of our throats. It casts its spell. A lullaby. We are the Lotus Eaters. Blindfolded guests of The Great Con: It diagnoses us and then, offers a cure”. It was without doubt the one of the most exciting and inspiring collaborations I’ve ever had.

Given the Swiss Alps setting of “Cure,” do you think that lent a classically “old world” melodic feeling to the score, especially with its use of the violin and grand waltzes?

Absolutely, yes. There was an incredible magnificence to the location, especially the way it was shot, that informed our choices in terms of the scale of orchestration.


For a score that’s mostly orchestral in nature, how did you want to use electronics?

It gave us another color, which was important especially as the truth of the story develops. In fact much of what appears to be electronic sonorities in the score started as warped acoustic recordings: violins, vocals, orchestral textures that were manipulated, stretched and transformed. Sometimes they were used for extremely uncomfortable sonic textures. Other times they were intended to evoke this disconcerting sense of perfection and sterility.


Could you talk about developing Hannah’s “ballerina” theme? And was it a natural that an eerie female voice would fit into this?

Hannah’s theme came very early on in the process, and it’s intended to feel like a lullaby with a dark secret. Something deceptive in its innocence. It was important for it to feel vulnerable, slightly restrained, with a symmetry and simplicity that is both child-like, and with a hidden potential. There’s a good reason why it’s sung by a female voice, but I don’t want to give out any spoilers!

What’s the story behind Mirel Wagner’s unplugged rendition of “I Wanna Be Sedated?”

Gore came across Mirel Wagner’s music and was keen on having her voice featured in the first trailer, performing a down tempo version of the classic Ramones song. Whilst we were recording her vocals, Mirel performed a version of the full song with guitar that just blew us away. We decided to turn it into a track for the soundtrack album.


Take a “Cure for Wellness” when its eely treatments begin in theaters on February 17th, with Benjamin Wallfisch’s score available on Milan Records HERE

Turn the “Lights Out” with Wallfisch HERE, go under “Pressure” HERE and count the “Hours” HERE

Join Benjamin Wallfisch, Pharrel Williams and Hans Zimmer as they count the “Hidden Figures” HERE

Visit Benjamin Wallfisch’s website HERE

Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Lakeshore to Release 'Legion' Soundtrack

Soundtrack News - Wo, 15/02/2017 - 02:00
Lakeshore Records will release two volumes of the [a.20097]Legion - Original Television Soundtrack[] digitally on February 24th, on CD March 24th, and on vinyl shortly thereafter. The album contains original music by [c.3178]Jeff Russo[] ([m.39686]Fargo[], [m.45422]The Night Of[]). [m.46788]Legion[], the critically acclaimed drama from creator/executive producer Noah Hawley, airs Wednesdays at 10pm ET/PT on FX. "When I first started working on [m.46788]Legion[], the showrunner Noah Hawley gave me some great feedback regarding the tonal palate, he suggested I read neurologist Oliver Sacks Hallucinations," said Russo. "It was a fascinating read and it really did help inspire. It is all about the way that our mind can change our perception of reality and what that says about our brains....

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

Beats ‘n resilience of WHOSE STREETS?

Film Music Magazine News - Do, 02/02/2017 - 21:30

“I’m the daughter of a jazz singer and grew up surrounded by music…doing homework in the back of jazz sessions and surrounded by some of the greatest musicians there were. When we were doing a late-night scoring session for the film with bassist Russel Hall from footage (of Ferguson, MO. uprising) that was bringing up so many personal burning questions that we had, it just lined up when it came time to do the score,” reflects WHOSE STREETS? first-time filmmaker Sabaah Folayan.

Whose Streets? is an unflinching look at how the killing of 18-year-old Mike Brown inspired a community to fight back and sparked a global movement.

“I just have to give credit props to Samora (Pinderhughes, Composer) because he came into a situation of first-time filmmakers, and he was able to be so generous and open during the creative process while never letting us go off-track.”

“I’m honored and just feel blessed to be a part of this film. I don’t come from a musical family but just fell into it because it was a calling. Jazz was my first real love…I went to the Julliard School and studied with one of the great pianists, Kenny Baron, then lucky enough to do the Sundance Composer’s Lab, which is when I learned what film music is about. Through the Lab, I was connected with Sabaah and Damon (Davis, co-Director). I had just released an album called Transformations, which is exactly what this film is about…the history of African diaspora protest movements, so I was inspired to write for a piece about Ferguson.”

“At that point (music scoring) in the filmmaking, it was really stressful for me personally,” advances co-Director Damon Davis. “So those recording sessions took me back to something, music, that always took stress away, an organic, cleansing thing. I get super giddy about music and so does he (Samora), so we knew he was our guy for this.”

Filmmaker Ms. Folayan turns to Mr. Pinderhughes to share an anecdote, “I don’t know if you even realized this but when you came on, we were in our edit way past when we should’ve been and stressed, and this was something that was just working, a relief. You had been working on your Transformations Suite for years, and there was that one beautiful, celebratory cue at the end of the film during a wedding that made the scene so gorgeous.”

Mr. Pinderhughes reflects, “The way jazz developed historically and in how it relates to this film, with how jazz is presented now, is that it’s academic, old, or complex, but just like most black art forms, they came from ‘the hood’ first. This film comes from poverty and struggle of the streets, it doesn’t come from schools or academies, so that’s what jazz means to me. So, what we do with jazz music, especially representing iconic folks like Billy Higgins and Max Roach, is the inspirations that were part of this film, those are members that were openly pro-black, about the music speaking in the most freeing way possible, people who are from the streets, not from concert halls.”

Ms. Folayan adds, “Ya, during the scoring process, it was spiritual, and there’s something about jazz improvisation tradition, it’s not like you can do just anything, can’t just be turned out, it has to be felt. It was crazy working with Samora when we both felt it at the same time.”

“Ya, and in order to have those moments, you have to all be in a space to be willing to fail. Because if I was pressured to get it right the first time, I wouldn’t have been able to get to where we got, and that’s why I was so happy to go through that process with them. For this particular project, it was really important that it not be me just doing stuff in isolation, then sending it to them. We would go to each other’s house and work…it was super organic between us.”

I ask Mr. Pinderhughes to talk about what it was like to communicate emotion to both a musician (Mr. Davis) and not a musician (Ms. Folayan)? He suggests, “Ya you know, because they’re clearly both artists, it wasn’t really that different. Even though Sabaah doesn’t play (instruments), she is ‘a musician.’ All her family are musicians and she thinks like a musician. They both knew what they wanted and it was my job to just translate it, like for example, the idea of chapter markings, that came late in the process but was an idea Sabaah had from the beginning. So, we tried a couple things that didn’t work but then we had that time and space and we figured it out. It required the right musicians and me figuring out what they were trying to get to and being able to translate that. Damon is a producer, so we used some of his songs and mine, but a bunch we produced together.”

Mr. Davis elaborates, “St. Louis is a landmark, monumental place but so are every musical forms that’s come out of the United States, whether it’s blues, jazz, rock, and we wanted to deliver it so it felt like St. Louis. Chuck Berry, one of the inventors of rock ‘n roll, would come out and play in St. Louis once a month. Ike and Tina Turner. I’m from East St. Louis, my last name is Davis, so ya, Miles Davis was a major influence in my life, and more importantly, who these people were in the world, when it comes to their political stances. My parents were a little older, so this music was what I heard just by proxy coming up that other kids my age didn’t. Musicians were at the forefront of that political era movement, and similarly to what’s happening today, the hip-hop community came out in support for Ferguson.”

Ms. Folayan emphasizes, “It worked that we made the decision not to use temp score because we didn’t want to cut the film with music that wasn’t for the film and I’d attribute that to Damon who came in with such a strong sense of musical identity, so when things weren’t right, we had someone who could definitively say, this is not the tone. We were in the editing stage a long time, and didn’t think maybe we would even use some of the music. Samora said for quite a while, I don’t know if these cues we’re even going to use, then did, so everything added up to what felt like destiny.”

“And we wrote a lot more music than we used in the film, like sometimes we say, ‘oh, this is a dope track but doesn’t work for the movie. So the editing process is as important as the writing…and we had great help,” exclaims Mr. Pinderhughes.

For example, Ms. Folayan gives props to Story Consultant Carol Dysinger, “Carol also spent a lot of time as a Music Editor, so she was able to come in and orient us all to what we needed to be looking for as a way music can function best.”

For many in the Black Lives Matter and Ferguson incident, a solidarity with the Palestinian struggle prevailed. Mr. Davis resonates on this development, “maybe there should’ve been some conversation about incorporating some regional musical elements.”

“I think part of the reason we didn’t use Palestinian instruments is because we made a conscious choice not to write for specific characters or for a little pieces of story because we tried that and it didn’t work, recalls Mr. Pinderhughes.

Ms. Folayan clarifies, “this was always about St. Louis, and while we do stand in solidarity with Palestine, to tell this story, we had to stay focused on St. Louis.”

I suggest that the Ferguson struggle and this film say some poignant stuff not just about the St. Louis area but more globally, about other cultures’ necessity to have their speaking-truth-to-power voice heard, and ask what would this team ideally like for their score to say to other world music regions?

Mr. Pinderhughes offers, “I think the reason the best art speaks to so many people is because it’s so specific, and this film speaks to the Ferguson situation so specifically. But I’m from the (San Francisco) Bay area, and we have had and are having so many similar issues and folks in conversation about it, so I think that it will be a lot of the same thing for people in London, India, South Africa, etc. Number one, they’ll get a snap shot of what this Ferguson thing and this music is, and relate to a group of people that stood up as a collective community…not only that, built their own culture.”

He continues, “A quarter of the music in the film is the community chanting in the streets…that is the music. I learned a lot on this film that language and the way people speak is a form of music.”

Mr. Davis wraps up with, “Samora was talking about Oakland, well the very last song is called, ‘Freedom Song,’ and I produced that song with a Boston songwriter, Natandra Driscoll, who sang and wrote those lyrics. When I was in Boston, she stopped and asked to sing a song for me while we were working on the movie and I said, ‘we have to record this, so she sent the lyrics and I wrote the music around them. That was someone from a completely different community, feeling a lot of the same stuff that we were feeling in Ferguson, and that ended up in the movie.”

Kendrick Lamar’s incomparable civil rights anthem, ‘Alright’ closes the picture over the end credit crawl and Ms. Folayan beams with, “thankfully our Music Supervisor was able to access those licenses for us, and we believe artists deserve to get paid for their work from that side of the community…oh, and I too was very excited Kendrick supported our struggles.

L-R, Damon Davis, Sabaah Folayan & FMM's Michael Rogers

Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

Interview with Andrew Lockington

Film Music Magazine News - Wo, 01/02/2017 - 22:06

From adolescents escaping a steampunk apocalypse shelter to kids taking on the Olympian gods to a college-age genius going back in time to solve daddy issues, Andrew Lockington is a composer with a fantastical, fresh sense of musical exploration and excitement. Beginning his own musical voyage in Canada alongside Oscar-winning composer Mychael Danna, Lockington had his mentor’s experimental, and often beautifully progressive stardust rub off on him as he progressed from assistant to orchestrator and conductor on such scores as “Felicia’s Journey,” “Green Dragon” and “Monsoon Wedding” finally making his own solo break on indies like “Touch of Pink,” “Saint Ralph” and “How She Move.” But it was through his epically exciting work on Brad Peyton’s 3-D take of “Journey to the Center of the Earth” that Lockington truly thrust himself onto the Hollywood radar. His increasingly notable progress through such genre films as “City of Ember,” “Journey 2: The Mysterious Island,” “Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters” and “San Andreas” showed Lockington’s talent for flexing an exuberantly thematic symphonic muscle – if not exactly the opportunity to combine his multiplex genre chops with romantic character drama, or the ethereal sound that inspired him.

That now changes in a big, beautiful way as Lockington’s talent for spectacle and emotion gets the chance to fully mesh for “The Space Between Us.” A sort of reverse “Martian,” “Space” finds a literal starman (or boy as it were) in Gardner Elliot (Asa Butterfield), The result of an astronaut’s fatally unexpected pregnancy, Gardner has spent his entire life on the red planet, yearning to visit his roots, and find his father on an Earth he’s only dreamt of. The teen makes his great escape, not realizing that his interstellar upbringing will make his visit physically lethal. But perhaps the price will be worth it as Gardner finds adventure, and attraction with Tulsa (Britt Robertson), a girl who helps him go on the run from the well-meaning authorities. It’s an adventure that Lockington captures with a soaring, star-crossed feeling very much in tune with such alt. sci-fi scores as “Wall-E,” “The Martian” and “Passengers” – a stylistic universe where strings and samples thematically forge into a surreal, captivatingly lush sound that’s not of this earth in the coolest ways. Percussion and oddball electronic samples convey a rocket ship future, while majestic strings play the natural, awe-struck wonder of an alien who just happens to be human, conveying the enchant of his first encounters with flying, animals and a girl’s touch – all while the ticking clock of his body’s out-of-place biology places his future in jeopardy. Lockington’s “Space” is a captivating, gorgeously poignant world to explore to both touching and exciting effect, a score that conveys youth appeal as a sense of wonder.

Why do you think you have a particular affinity for scores that feature young characters exploring the unknown like “Journey 2: The Mysterious Island,” “City of Ember” and “Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters?” And do you think that made you an ideal composer for “The Space Between Us?”

What drew me to “The Space Between Us” were two things. One, I’ve been a huge fan of the director, Peter Chelsom, for many years. I remember seeing one of his films in the theater and saying to my wife afterwards that I’d love to work with that director someday. He has a way of putting his audience inside the consciousness of his characters. Somehow he manages to do it without the audience recognizing his methods and somehow he’s completely consistent with it on every project. I love the opportunity that gives the composer – not needing to pry that door open, but to already have it opened for you.

The second thing that drew me to the film was the script. Jason Markey, EVP of Music at STX, challenged me to come up with a way to tell an epic story using more intimate instrumentation in places. We sat in his office and I played him some sketches from my library of music ideas. He fell in love with the instrumentation of a song I wrote and that survived as an element for one of the themes in the film.

I loved that the film was telling a very intimate story within an epic landscape, and I immediately related to the characters despite the sci-fi nature of the story. It was a story everyone could relate to – finding the place you belong in this world. Gardner’s circumstances may take that statement far more literally, since he’s literally born on Mars, but his journey is one the audience will relate to, and helping the audience find their way inside the characters of a film is an important part of scoring a story.


How do you think your score fits into the sound of character-driven sci-fi scores like “Wall-E,” “The Martian” and “Passengers?” especially given that you were dealing with teenage characters?

I didn’t set out to fit in with a “sound” per se, but more to properly reflect the relationships between the characters in this film. Not to say that the sci-fi element didn’t have any influence on the score, but I wanted to follow the main character’s journey as he looks to earth with fresh eyes (and ears). Everything is new to him, and everything is amazing. So I wanted the score to take that idea and run with it. That inspired me to look to more than just traditional music instruments and instead to find other ways of creating music.

I set out to find music in things we regularly overlook. Old ice cream bowls from a flea market in Paris, old trumpet mutes repurposed into a percussion instrument, salvaged rusted metal from old buildings, an old school bell, etc. I walked around with my cello bow, bowing everything and anything. I also armed myself with piano hammers (salvaged from the “San Andreas” piano I’d destroyed) and would strike random things with them. I discovered musical sounds in things I’d never imagined using in a score. Peter loved these ideas and these sounds, and then challenged me to use them in such a way that they wouldn’t sound discarded, and instead sound like they belonged with the orchestral elements they would be merged with.

On that note, how “sci-fi” did you want to make the score?

Well the great thing about this exercise was that it put me in a place I wasn’t comfortable with musically. That’s a good thing for a composer. This process involved getting lost in the wilderness and using the elements around you to get back to a place you recognize. It was fantastic, and a lot of the sci-fi qualities people hear in the score weren’t set out to sound that way, but instead came from this approach. It not only worked well to guide my writing in this score, it’s most definitely affected how I will approach scoring other projects going forward.

In terms of ‘space’ and sci-fi, the only element we ever really discussed in that regard was reverb. When you’re working with music and artificial reverbs, you have the ability to isolate the reverberation of a sound and separate it from the dry source material. It’s not something you can do in nature, but it’s something musicians and engineers are very family with – removing the direct signal and hearing only the reverb. Peter and I started playing around with the idea of introducing a theme or a sound in reverb only, removing the source sound altogether. That idea influenced the “Launch Cue” where we not only used this approach, but also took it even further by using other waveforms in place of the traditional reverb impulses. Now, rather than the reverb just decaying, it follows another sound wave enveloping pattern. The end result was an orchestral element that could sound as natural, or as otherworldly as we wanted at any given time. That ability to choose became an important thematic element in the score.

What do you think creates a musical sense of wonder, especially when it comes to strings and bell percussion?

Music is a combination of so many elements – musical structure, simplicity, complexity, melody, amplitude, and chord progression. For this project, I was most focused on reflecting the innocence of Gardner, and his lack of social defensiveness. I loved that aspect of Asa’s character and of the story. As we look back on our lives, we all have memories where the fear of social judgment prevented us from doing something we wish we’d done or something we wish we’d said. Gardner doesn’t have that. He says what he thinks and does what he wants. It’s not that he doesn’t care what others think, he just hasn’t developed the defense mechanisms the rest of us have. His innocence is ridiculed by others in the story but we come to recognize his handicap as a gift. He’s immune to the paralysis the rest of us get from fear. His only fear is that he’ll die before experiencing what it’s like to be human. This helped me greatly. It gave the score license to do the same for his character and not adhere to the usual emotional filters required to score the other characters. The emotion of the score could follow Gardner and see the world through his eyes. I loved writing with his perspective.

“Space” director Peter Chelsom has had a truly unique career with such movies as “Funny Bones,” “The Mighty” and “Hannah Montana: The Movie.” Given that this was his first movie in the genre, and with this kind of scope, how do you think you helped him meet the challenge?

I love doing a film genre I’ve never done before so I can only imagine directors feel the same way. The hardest projects to do are the ones where they’ve temped your score and fallen in love with it. Those are the projects you need to figure out how to do something brand new for a genre you’ve successfully done before. Creative people don’t like doing the same thing multiple times, and Peter is no exception to that. I think that’s what made this film so perfect for him. I also think it gave him permission to explore humor in a different way than he has before. I love the humor in this film because there are no punch lines, and there’s no ridicule. Instead Peter helps us find the humor behind common slang and social rituals that, when you look at them from an outside perspective, are really quite ridiculous. He presents this in a very clever way such that you never feel sorry or judge Gardner for not understanding these moments, instead you laugh at yourself. You find humor in the understanding that something you’ve always said actually makes no sense. I hope the music was able to help him achieve that as well in some way.

Tell us about your main themes for “The Space Between Us?”

The main theme, and most difficult theme in the film, was Gardner’s. When we meet him for the first time he’s just arrived – this beautiful baby in his mother’s arms – a moment in real life that emotionally only has one color, one element – it’s as pure an emotion as you can get. That really got me, because every other life moment is much more complex. When a loved one passes away, it’s not just sadness, it’s more complicated that that. But the birth of a baby, in that moment, is just pure love. So coming up with something for that moment alone would not have been complicated. But while that theme needed to represent Gardner’s birth, it had to do so much more. It needed to score his mother’s death. It needed to score his longing for finding his father. It needed to exist within completely contrasting emotions and much more complex situations as he journeyed through the story.

The theme I wrote doesn’t just represent Gardner, it represents hope, it represents tragedy, it represents humanity at it’s best and it’s worst. It was a huge challenge. My father is a very gifted painter, and talks often about the importance of mixing colors. The same paint color can project different qualities depending on the context in which you see it. Those complex shades of color need to be there, but be able to be hidden or emphasized by manipulating the context around it. This theme needed to do the same.

I had a similar challenge with the arc for Nathaniel (Gary Oldman). When we first start on this storyline it’s pure optimism. It’s a celebration of the technological achievement of sending a team of astronauts to live on another planet. Nathaniel is giving a speech to investors and introducing the ship and the astronauts to a crowd. It’s a euphoric moment the first time we experience it, but one that we revisit later in the film with the hindsight of the tragic circumstances that followed. This theme very much embodied his storyline and his character – the two were forever intertwined and interrelated, and like Gardner’s theme, it needed to be a chameleon and keep it’s shape while changing it’s color.

Probably my favorite theme in the film we called “Water”. I set out to write a melody that never resolved, that was always in conflict with it’s accompanying chord progression, yet could still feel beautiful. It needed to sound slightly off, yet sure of itself. So I wrote a melody I liked then took the melody and transposed it up a semi-tone while keeping the accompaniment in the same key. The result is a minor second clash between the first note of the theme and the chord. But by then moving the melody up an octave, the theme found a musical place where it almost belonged (a minor 9th sounds more pleasing than a minor 2nd). “Almost” was the operative word, because any resolution in the melody needed to be accompanied by a clash in the supporting chord, and vice-versa. Peter fell in love with it.

The first time we hear it as a piece of Italian Opera that Carla Gugino’s character is working out to in the space station on Mars. Peter speaks Italian and wrote the lyrics to my melody. I found an amazing singer in Toronto, Maeve Palmer, and she did an incredible job performing the source piece. I love finding moments where you can introduce a theme in a way like this as it’s immediately engrained in the consciousness of the characters.

Beyond its “Martian” angle, a drawing point for the youth audience is its seemingly doomed romance. How did you want to play this aspect of the score, and to have the music make you root for its main couple?

What I loved about the story is that the romantic connection happens while they’re on a mission to find Gardner’s father and experience the world before Gardner dies. As such, the music couldn’t be romantic in that way, and instead needed to, on the surface, score the romance of the journey. It’s a play on the famous John Lennon quote “Life is what happens when you’re making other plans”. Their romantic connection happens because she’s helping him experience everything in the world in a short few days. She’s very frustrated with the world and the hand she’s been dealt, so she gets a reset on how she sees the world as she joins him in seeing it through his eyes. As such, it was important that their connection motif only reveal its true meaning after we’d heard it many times before.

Tell us about the race-against-time aspect of “Space’s” score to save Gardner from his own wanderlust?

This is where a lot of the “found” and “junk” instruments became very useful. There is an accordion feel to the pace of the story. There’s definitely a ticking clock as they race to find Gardner before he dies, but that also serves to better show the moments in the story where time stands still and there’s a lack of pace and time. I had fallen in love with the inherent pitches of these instruments and knew I had to use them in their natural form as much as possible. I would play a lot of rhythmic patterns on them and record absolutely everything I improvised. Many of those initial ideas I was able to edit and cut together to become important motor elements in the score.

Could you talk about achieving a balance between the orchestra and the music’s electronic element? And what were the main instruments on both sides of the score?

In addition to the new instruments I mentioned, piano and strings were very significant elements to the score. The piano is never heard in its pure form though. Every time you hear it, it’s doubled with one of the “metallophone’esque” instruments. After playing with the timbre of the piano and even trying prepared piano, I found this method far more successful in achieving an unusual variation on an otherwise familiar instrument.

The strings were treated in many of the cues as described above and later on the film can be heard in their natural form. There’s one cue in particular where Nathaniel’s character starts to reveal his humanity. It was the perfect moment to dial back the reverb manipulation and subconsciously reveal to the audience the true nature of the music they’ve been hearing.

“The Space Between Us’ is one of your most beautiful scores, particularly on the soaring cues “Biplane” and “Ocean.” Was the idea to always make it lush and melodic, as opposed to going for a more “sampled” approach?

Yes I think the lush and melodic aspect came from our first conversations. The majority of my discussions with Peter were about character and story, and finding the beauty in all situations in life, even finding beauty in death and what comes from it. This inspired the melodic and thematic approach.

Given the young audience it’s aiming for, there are some surprisingly cool songs in “Space” that capture an ethereal quality. How did you want your score to fit into their groove, or was it ever a consideration?

The score and songs crossed in a few places, and they needed to sound like they were from the same world for sure. The only real consideration in that regard was the use of piano, because the character Tulsa (Britt Robertson), writes the song “Smallest Light” in the film and plays it on the piano. It was written by the extraordinary Ingrid Michaelson, and is reprised in the film in a few places. Ingrid also wrote another amazing song called “Stay Right Where You Are” for the film from which we used one of the vocal lines over the score cue that followed it. There were some significant hand-offs between songs and score like that, and therefore some last minute challenges when a source song would change and the new song would be in a different key and/or tempo than I planned for. Other than that, we were quite happy with the score and the songs each having their own purpose. This wasn’t one of those soundtracks where you want the audience to never know if it’s song or score they’re hearing.

In that respect, what do you think about the dominance of “hybrid” scores today? Do you think that composers need to keep on top of both their orchestral, and sampling chops to prove effective in that market?

I think most composers don’t think that hard about it. We’re fortunate to have so many other colors in our paint palette than composers have historically had. The biggest challenge is to make sure whatever we’re writing stays relevant and timeless. There’s music from 20 years ago that you can almost date to the month of when it was written. There are films that were edited which used, and over-used, the latest avid features of the day, and they don’t hold up now. The biggest stipulation for me in my writing is that I make sure the medium and the tools never overshadow the message and the emotion. That doesn’t mean overlooking the new technology available to us, but it also doesn’t mean you have to use it. Use what’s appropriate to the story you’re trying to tell.

If “The Space Between Us” has a musical cousin, then it’s in your ethereal score for the time travel drama “I’ll Follow You Down.”

I really love sci-fi, so I was really excited when the filmmaker Richie Mehta told me the concept of the film and asked me to score it. It turned out to be even more interesting than I’d thought, because he made a film focusing on the morality and ethics around altering time. He didn’t focus on the technology. That allowed me to write a much more character driven score, a score that plays with the idea of time, backwards time and time out of order. After our initial conversations about all the cool new tech toys we could use to score the movie, we came full circle to a place that avoided all modern manipulation and used ancient and conventional instruments to score the story. There are some very complex keyboard passages in that score. My keyboarding skill improved greatly because of it.

What can we expect from the giant monster mash videogame adaptation “Rampage,” your next movie with Brad, which also reteams you with The Rock?

As with all Brad projects, we start talking about the music before the script is even finished. I’ve been researching this score and working with Brad to figure out an approach for the past six months and we’ve come up with a palette that I’m incredibly excited about. Music is so embedded in Brad’s plan for storytelling that often ideas we discuss actually influence some of the character and visual aspects of his films. Music is a parallel process for him. He was in Atlanta scouting locations last November and called me down to join him. Over the course of those few days we hatched our approach.

Can you talk about scoring Brad’s Netflix series “Frontier,” which just recently premiered? And what’s the challenge of making score for a “historical” score contemporarily vibrant?

“Frontier” is a treacherous world to write for. The series takes place in the time of the fur trade – late 1700′s in the upper half of North America. The show is centered around Declan Harp (Jason Momoa), a Cree / Irish man who is seeking revenge for the death of his people. Around him are a cast of colorful characters who’ve been drawn to this dangerous world by greed and opportunity, as well as the people who’s land they all descended upon. It’s a power struggle between the British Hudson’s Bay Company, the Metis, the Cree, the French, the Americans and many independent factions vying for a piece of the trade.

I was very encouraged after speaking with Brad and the other producers. They all had an understanding how important the music was in their design the show. Early on I found a music consultant who had written a thesis on “Music of the fur trade”. This moment in history was fascinating because you had all of these different cultures and peoples coming together to trade and share goods. Gold, silver, weapons and fur weren’t the only currency – they also traded culture, rituals and music. As a result, music of the time incorporated elements of the other cultures around them – a perfect opportunity for a unique hybrid score.

While the majority of the instrumentation I use has historical justification, the producers gave me license to use these angles in a modern way. The score isn’t meant to console or encourage the people like the secular or sacred music of the time, but rather to narrate the true feelings and emotions experienced by our characters. There is fiddle, but it’s processed through a bit crusher, ring modulator and multiple filters. There are frame drums and ethnic winds, but they’re layered and manipulated into textures with delays. By combining these elements and manipulating them it gives the score it’s own sound, a set of rules and an identity right out of the gate. From there I wrote some orchestral themes that serve to act anthems for the missions of each group. The strings are the added element instead of the base element of the cues, which is backwards from how I’ve often worked in the past. It’s a very dark world to write for, but I love that we’re not trying to be too historical with the music and have instead lay out our own parameters for the sound of the show.

The best movies like “Hidden Figures” and “The Martian” can make young viewers to reach for the stars. How do you hope that your music for a teen movie like “Space” will help inspire its viewers in that fashion?

I hope the film inspires it’s audience in the same way it inspired the team of us that worked on it. We all need to step back and take a look at our lives through fresh eyes, and with a fresh perspective sometimes. I think the film will resonate with all audiences and I know people will find it quite moving. I’m very proud to have contributed to that.

Take a trip with Andrew Lockington to “The Space Between Us” HERE on Sony Classical Records, and fly with the film when it opens on February 3.” Then travel back in time with Lockington as he says “I’ll Follow You Down on Intrada Records HERE, before rocking out with “San Andreas” on WaterTower Music HERE


Visit Andrew Lockington’s web page HERE

Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: 89th Academy Awards Nominations Announced

Soundtrack News - Wo, 25/01/2017 - 02:00

This morning, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced the nominations for [t.46838]The 89th Academy Awards[]. The nominees are as follows:

Best Original Score
[m.47075]Jackie[], [c.9466]Mica Levi[]
[m.43740]La La Land[], [c.2205]Justin Hurwitz[]
[m.45859]Lion[], [c.1784]Dustin O'Halloran[] & [c.15056]Hauschka[]
[m.46878]Moonlight[], [c.4631]Nicholas Britell[]
[m.44388]Passengers[], [c.149]Thomas Newman[]

Best Original Song
"Audition" from [m.43740]La La Land[]
"Can't Stop the Feeling" from [m.35217]Trolls[]
"City of Stars" from [m.43740]La La Land[]
"The Empty Chair from [m.45400]Jim: The James Foley Story[]
"How Far I'll Go" from [m.42413]Moana[]

The Oscars will be held on February...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Varese Sarabande to Release Brian Tyler's & Robert Lydecker's 'xXx: Return of Xander Cage' Score

Soundtrack News - Di, 24/01/2017 - 02:00
Varèse Sarabande will release the soundtrack for [m.45724]xXx: Return of Xander Cage[] digitally on January 27 and on CD February 17, 2017. The film features original music composed by [c.361]Brian Tyler[] ([m.34056]Avengers: Age of Ultron[], [m.37596]Furious 7[]) and [c.10106]Robert Lydecker[] ([m.46285]Designated Survivor[], TV's [m.23816]Sleepy Hollow[]). "[m.45724]xXx: Return of Xander Cage[] is a wild movie and it needed a score to reflect the vibe that Xander Cage and his team has: attitude, skill, and a sense of humor about oneself." said Tyler. "The music features an amazing orchestra which captures the emotion and epic qualities while the rock elements of the score reflect his hardcore attitude of the entire team in the film." "The director [DJ Caruso] and I have worked...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Weekly Roundup: January 20

Soundtrack News - Za, 21/01/2017 - 02:00
This week, the nominations for the Guild of Music Supervisors Awards were announced. Check out the nominees here [url./news/article/?id=2314]here[]. Announced this week were new composer assignments for [c.1154]John Paesano[] ([m.41538]Pacific Rim 2[]), [c.2269]Ludwig Goransson[] ([m.47760]Everything, Everything[]), [c.1318]Daniel Pemberton[] ([m.48366]Felt[]), among many others. For the full list of composer and music supervisor assignments from this week, [url./composers/]click here[]. Over 20 new soundtrack albums were released this week. [da.2017-01-16]Click here for the full schedule[]. Opening nationwide this week is (with music by): [m.44986]Split[] ([c.13730]West Dylan Thordson[]), [m.45724]xXx: Return of Xander Cage[] ([c.361]Brian Tyler[] &...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: 7th Annual Guild of Music Supervisors Nominations Announced

Soundtrack News - Vr, 20/01/2017 - 02:00
The Guild of Music Supervisors announced its seventh annual awards event taking place on February 16, 2017 at Ace Hotel in Los Angeles. The awards will recognize outstanding Music Supervisors in 15 categories representing Motion Picture, Television, Games, Trailers and Advertising. Here are film-related nominations: BEST MUSIC SUPERVISION FOR FILMS BUDGETED OVER 25 MILLION DOLLARS [c.5502]John Houlihan[] for [m.42040]Deadpool[] [c.14997]Steven Gizicki[] for [m.43740]La La Land[] [c.8616]Jojo Villanueva[] for [m.45087]Sing[] [c.3940]Becky Bentham[] for [m.45521]Sing Street[] [c.3969]Julia Michels[] and [c.4291]Julianne Jordan[] for [m.35217]Trolls[] BEST MUSIC SUPERVISION FOR FILMS BUDGETED UNDER 25 MILLION DOLLARS [c.3969]Julia Michels[] for [m.45982]Bad...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

ALBUM REVIEW: Kubo and the Two Strings

Soundtrack News - Za, 14/01/2017 - 02:00

[m.42722]Kubo and the Two Strings[] dazzled audiences with some of the most beautiful animation and heartfelt storytelling seen in 2016. Directed by Travis Knight, the story of [m.42722]Kubo and The Two Strings[] journeys through adventurous, beautifully lush, and cleverly animated sets. The movie features Kubo (Art Parkinson) and his friends, Monkey (Charlize Theron) and Beatle (Matthew McConaughey), as they search for a magical suit of armor. The characters discover a mysterious past and form connections which reveal long lost memories.

The atmosphere constructed by the film's storyline and animation provide [c.1069]Dario Marianelli[]...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Weekly Roundup: January 13

Soundtrack News - Za, 14/01/2017 - 02:00
[c.2205]Justin Hurwitz[] took home two Golden Globes last Sunday for his music to [m.43740]La La Land[], for both his score and the original song 'City of Stars'. For the full story, [url./news/article/?id=2307]click here[]. This week, the nominations for the British Film Academy Awards (BAFTA) were announced. Check out the nominees in the category "Original Music" [url./news/article/?id=2303]here[]. Congratulations to all the nominees. Announced this week were new composer assignments for [c.1061]Marcelo Zarvos[] ([m.46723]Wonder[]), [c.1748]Fernando Velazquez[] ([m.48309]Marrowbone[]), [c.139]Mark Mothersbaugh[] ([m.48310]Beatriz at Dinner[]), among many others. For the full list of composer and music supervisor assignments from this week, [url./composers/]click...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Ariana Grande and John Legend to Record 'Beauty And The Beast' Title Song

Soundtrack News - Vr, 13/01/2017 - 02:00

Grammy-nominated and multi-platinum selling artist Ariana Grande and 10-time Grammy-, Oscar®-winning and multi-platinum selling singer/songwriter/musician John Legend are set to perform the Oscar and Grammy-winning duet "Beauty and the Beast" as the title track for Disney's upcoming soundtrack to the live-action film adaptation [m.43383]Beauty and the Beast[]. The song will also be featured in the film.

The enchanting ballad, originally performed by Celine Dion and Peabo Bryson featuring eight-time Oscar-winning composer [c.294]Alan Menken[]'s beautiful melody and two-time Oscar-winner [c.3635]Howard Ashman[]'s unforgettable lyrics, received an Academy Award®, Golden Globe® and GRAMMY Award, among other accolades, upon its release in 1991.

The new rendition of the...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Gravitas Ventures to Release 'SCORE' Documentary in May

Soundtrack News - Do, 12/01/2017 - 02:00

Gravitas Ventures has acquired first-of-its-kind documentary [m.43853]SCORE: A Film Music Documentary[] for North American rights. The film takes an unprecedented look at the creative process of film score composition with some of the best-known artists in the field including [c.237]Hans Zimmer[], [c.231]John Williams[], [c.58]Danny Elfman[], [c.1745]Trent Reznor[], [c.150]Randy Newman[], [c.200]Howard Shore[], [c.168]Rachel Portman[], [c.77]Jerry Goldsmith[], [c.282]Quincy Jones[], the late [c.89]James Horner[], and more.

Additionally, viewers will get to hear from iconic filmmakers like James Cameron and the late Garry Marshall. Among the many diverse and treasured film themes included in the film are the James Bond theme, [m.24564]Star Wars[], [m.21184]Indiana Jones[],...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: BAFTA Nominations Announced

Soundtrack News - Wo, 11/01/2017 - 02:00

The nominations for the 70th British Academy Film Awards were announced today. The nominees in the film music related category are as follows:

Original Music:
[m.44592]Arrival[] - [c.3198]Johann Johannsson[]
[m.47075]Jackie[] - [c.9466]Mica Levi[]
[m.43740]La La Land[] - [c.2205]Justin Hurwitz[]
[m.45859]Lion[] - [c.1784]Dustin O'Halloran[] & [c.15056]Hauschka[]
[m.46203]Nocturnal Animals[] - [c.1294]Abel Korzeniowski[]

The British Academy Film Awards will be given out on February 12, 2017. For further details on all of the nominees in each category, visit...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws
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