Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: WaterTower Music Announces 'Birds of Prey' Score Release

Soundtrack News - Za, 15/02/2020 - 01:00
WaterTower Music is excited to announce today's release of the score for [m.53679]Birds of Prey (And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn[] by [c.1318]Daniel Pemberton[]. Directed by Cathy Yan, and co-produced by star Margo Robbie, the film was released in theaters February 7, 2020. Birds of Prey: Original Motion Picture Score features 27 new tracks composed for the motion picture by [c.1318]Daniel Pemberton[]. "One of the best things about writing this score was the fact I felt Harley Quinn as a character would be into anything – I can see her listening to whatever she wants: opera, metal, hip-hop, EDM, rockabilly, gospel, pop. I always felt she didn't really care for one thing – she'd absorb them all and not give a...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Billie Eilish’s Theme Song for 'No Time to Die' Released

Soundtrack News - Vr, 14/02/2020 - 01:00
Today, five-time Grammy Award winning Darkroom/Interscope Records artist Billie Eilish has released her latest song, [a.27627]No Time To Die[], the official theme song to the upcoming James Bond film. The song was produced by her brother; fellow multi Grammy Award winning FINNEAS alongside Stephen Lipson, with orchestral arrangements by [c.237]Hans Zimmer[] and [c.27979]Matt Dunkley[], and guitar from [c.1799]Johnny Marr[]. [m.52688]No Time To Die[] comes ahead of the film's global release, which hits theatres from April 2 in the U.K. through Universal Pictures International and in the U.S on April 10 through MGM via their United Artists Releasing banner. 18-year-old Eilish is officially the youngest artist in history to both write and...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Hildur Gudnadottir, Elton John & Bernie Taupin Win Academy Awards

Soundtrack News - Zo, 09/02/2020 - 01:00

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced the winners of [t.57487]The 92nd Academy Awards[] tonight. The nominees and winners in the music categories are as follows:

Best Original Score
Winner: [m.53148]Joker[], [c.7675]Hildur Gudnadottir[]
[m.53146]Little Women[], [c.752]Alexandre Desplat[]
[m.56170]Marriage Story[], [c.150]Randy Newman[]
[m.54413]1917[], [c.149]Thomas Newman[]
[m.38439]Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker[], [c.231]John Williams[]

Best Original Song
"I Can't Let You Throw Yourself Away" from [m.40665]Toy Story 4[], Music and Lyric by [c.150]Randy Newman[]
Winner: "(I'm Gonna) Love Me Again" from [m.52669]Rocketman[], Music by [c.610]Elton John[]; Lyric by [c.2371]Bernie...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Back Lot Music Announces 'The Photograph' Soundtrack

Soundtrack News - Za, 08/02/2020 - 01:00
Back Lot Music has released the original motion picture soundtrack to Universal Pictures' [m.55420]The Photograph[] today. The soundtrack to the film features an original score by multi-Grammy winning recording artist [c.17310]Robert Glasper[], as well as two new songs by recent Grammy nominee Lucky Daye and Grammy winning artist H.E.R. The romantic drama, starring Issa Rae and LaKeith Stanfield, arrives in theaters nationwide on Valentine's Day. The warm, rich and sophisticated jazz music that suffuses almost every frame of [m.55420]The Photograph[] was exactly what writer-director Stella Meghie had envisioned to accompany the film's visual aesthetic. She couldn't think of any better choice to capture that vision than Grammy...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Hildur Gudnadottir Wins at 73rd BAFTA Film Awards

Soundtrack News - Ma, 03/02/2020 - 01:00

Earlier today, the 73rd British Academy Film Awards were given out at the Royal Opera House in London. The nominees and winners in the music category were as follows:

Original Score:
[m.54413]1917[] - [c.149]Thomas Newman[]
[m.55572]Jojo Rabbit[] - [c.534]Michael Giacchino[]
Winner: [m.53148]Joker[] - [c.7675]Hildur Gudnadottir[]
[m.53146]Little Women[] - [c.752]Alexandre Desplat[]
[m.38439]Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker[] - [c.231]John...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Weekly Roundup: January 31

Soundtrack News - Za, 01/02/2020 - 01:00
[c.7675]Hildur Gudnadottir[] was honored with her first Grammy Award last Sunday for her score for HBO's [m.52612]Chernobyl[]. Natalie Hemby, [c.19387]Lady Gaga[], Hillary Lindsey & Aaron Raitiere won the award for the song "I'll Never Love Again" from [m.47155]A Star Is Born[], which was also the winner in the "Best Compilation Soundtrack Album for Visual Media" category. For the full story, [url./news/article/?id=2922]click here[]. Announced this week were new composer assignments for [c.1354]Benjamin Wallfisch[] ([m.55735]The Invisible Man[]), [c.8705]Junkie XL[] ([m.46306]Scoob![]) and [c.11690]Kris Bowers[] ([m.57611]Mrs. America[]), among many others. For the full list of composer and music supervisor assignments from this week, [url./composers/]click here[]....

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

Interview with Colin Stetson

Film Music Magazine News - Vr, 31/01/2020 - 17:04

(photo by Jonathan Durand)

Given his ability to conjure insanity with a distinctively terrifying and transfixing voice, one might imagine composer Colin Stetson straight jacketed into a lunatic’s cell with his gear, babbling about unimaginable monsters on the other side of hell and space. However, that void where most straight-laced film musicians might fear to tread is home for a rising, unclassifiable voice in a Hollywood whose scoring sound is increasingly mutating into a thing of melody, dissonance and sound design – a creature whose acolytes are becoming more popular than ever with the ear and mind-bending likes of Mica Levi’s “Under the Skin,” The Newton Brothers’ “Doctor Sleep” and Geoff Barrow and Ben Salisbury’s “Annihilation.” Worshipped by hip listeners weaned on alternative music, it’s an unfathomable style whose tentacles are now spreading beyond the worlds of horror and science fiction – and perhaps are no more strikingly than in Stetson’s hands. 

With a horn as his first notable instrument, Stetson jammed with the likes of Arcade Fire, Tom Waites, The Chemical Brothers and Laurie Anderson. Developing his repertoire with saxophone and clarinet while songwriting, Stetson established himself in the alt-Avant garde world with albums that included “Those Who Didn’t Run,” “All this I Do for Glory,” the trilogy of “New History Warfare” and his interpretation of Gorecki’s third symphony for “Sorrow.” Stetson’s talent for disturbed melancholy would accompany the fact-based rampage of a shooter and his disciple in 2013’s “Blue Caprice,” a film he co-scored with then-wife and collaborator Sarah Neufeld. They’d hear the sins of the past in “Lavender,” with Stetson also scoring the dark western “Outlaws and Angels” (with Aleks de Carvalho). But Stetson’s ability to tap nightmare fuel would truly explode for Ari Aster’s “Hereditary.” With unbearable, grinding builds, nerve-shredding sustains, and relentless, slicing rhythm, Stetson’s God-knows-what embodiment of satanic evil gradually taking over a distraught family was nearly devoid of melodic nicety, perfect for one of the most unnerving films ever made, and more than likely to serve as a torture device outside of its confines.   

Stetson was able to return to harmonic earth by scoring Hulu’s Mars mission show “The First,” as well as lending haunting music to the devastatingly intimate foster-care-to-jail drama “Age Out,” – yet both with a tone still far apart from the scoring norm. Now Stetson is back on unearthly ground to embody the “Color out of Space.” It’s exactly the kind of Lovecraft bizarreness a cult fan would expect to mark the long-awaited feature return of South African filmmaker Richard Stanley, who’d assembled the killer robot of “Hardware” and journeyed with the mythical demon of “Dust Devil” before he career was derailed in an attempt to realize the manimals inhabiting “The Island of Dr. Moreau.” Now with the support of Nicolas Cage, Hollywood’s reigning avatar of delightfully berserk acting, Stanley is able to rend an Alpaca-raising, back-to-nature family to purple pieces when a meteor lands in their property. 

Given Stanley’s strikingly hued, lovingly bizarre vision of being sucked into a body and vegetable-mutating alien power as the ultimate trip, Stetson’s music is a similar mélange of freak-out scares and insane intoxication. As opposed to “Hereditary,” it’s a weirdly, ultra-listenable soundtrack that works within and without its pulsating body. Steadily pouring on sampled weirdness with rock shades of Pink Floyd, the gurgling of unimaginable creatures and waves of chattering percussion amidst its sonic whirlpool, Stetson once again creates a soundtrack not of this earth. But like Lovecraft’s hapless humans who are pulled to take a mind-shredding glimpse into the unfathomable, Stetson’s use of haunted melody amidst all of the craziness is once again a siren call to a completely uncompromising wall of highly crafted sound. It’s a score that’s like nothing out there in an increasingly evolving and daring realm of what constitutes music. And for the daring, Stetson’s “Color out of Space” is a glimpse into madness that they’ll be happy to take for a composer who continues to step into unknowable Lovecraftian realms through his art.  

How did you go from alternative music to film scoring?

In 2013, Alexandre Moors made a film called “Blue Caprice.” He’d been listening to my solo music which gave him the inspiration to go in a specific direction with his score. He asked me if I’d ever considered a scoring a film, so that turned into my first soundtrack, which I did in collaboration with my now ex-wife Sarah Neufeld. So becoming a film composer wasn’t quite a whim, but something that I had been meaning to get into but had literally never had the time because touring had made it impossible. I scored “Blue Caprice” during every waking hour in the week here or the week there when I wasn’t playing with Arcade Fire. It was a wonderful experience, because it was all about Alexandre putting faith into people had been completely untested with within the medium. Then after that, things just started to gain momentum. Sarah and I went on to do two more films together, and then I started acquiring more jobs over the years. Between film and television, I’ve done around 15 projects in between all of the touring and albums of my own. 

Do you think that working with bands helped you develop as a composer?

(photo by Jonathan Durand)

The main thrust of the job is that you are working for a director and a producer. But ultimately, you’re working for this picture, this narrative story in whatever way it’s being told. So in a way you’re jettisoning ego. Your job is to simply to make this greater vision come to life and to enhance it in whatever way that you can. When I’m working with songwriters, I’m trying to like analyze what they already have within the song, and what I can add to it with the proficiencies that I already have in hand, or what it is that I can learn how to do to identify its structure. It’s the same kind of problem solving and world building when you score a film. There’s, a lot of creativity, but it’s a very pointed creativity that’s all bent towards a specific goal.

Was it the unconventionality of your alternative voice that was attracting filmmakers to your work? 

Yeah, for sure. There’s the allure of the unique. Beyond just being unconventional sonically, my music tends to have already within it a bit of an epic scope that’s oriented towards the visual. For example, my “New History Warfare” trilogy of records has a narrative that was always meant to be a graphic novel that fed the music and the narrative alongside of it like a kind of second skin. So it has not been a surprise to me to do the transition into film. It’s actually been quite seamless because I already functioned that way. To acknowledge that other people have noticed that through their own devices is certainly fortunate. It’s also a testament to how much can actually be conveyed when we take the time to try and imbue our creations with a level of intention. So scoring is something that cyclically fed out of the solo and the group work. 

Your score for Ari Aster’s “Hereditary” put you on the map, especially given how even more frightening it made the film. What’s it like to write essentially a melody-free score that could inspire madness?

 “Hereditary” is one of those rare films that’s truly perfect. It was very lean, and exactly what it needed to be. Not anymore or less. I read the script a couple of years before the film was made. From the moment of that infamous mouth “pop” I was hooked and realized that this was a thing that I had to do because no one else was going to be making a film quite like this. For me, the ease I had in doing “Hereditary” was that it’s not so much of a horror film as it is a very tense, very emotional drama of loss, grief and dysfunction that’s couched inside the vessel of a horror film. I consider myself as genre-less in regard to film as I do to music. I’ve been tapped to do a lot of horror and more suspenseful things because the sounds that come quite naturally to me make people uncomfortable and reliably induce feelings of panic (laughs). But for me, the, the main, challenge of that that film was to completely stay in the shadows the whole time. Because as soon as I stepped out and did anything recognizably melodic or thematic, something that you really could latch onto, even for a second, then it was too much.

(photo by Jonathan Durand)

There were a couple moments in the very beginning where I had sewn something melodic in, and they were quickly left on the studio floor. The whole of the score became a reverse-construction of that final scene and final track “Reborn.” So if you listen backwards, you’ll see that all of the bits and pieces that make up the whole of that score or basically just kind of a bread crumb trail leading to that theme. But it’s obscured, and very purposefully. I wrote the whole, I wrote and recorded the whole of that score out in my studio in Vermont, which is in a very isolated spot in the woods. I spent all of those months virtually all alone with that film and this music. People ask me a lot “How the fuck did you not go insane?” And I never really thought about it that way. There were a couple moments where I would work way too late and then hear everything in the house and outside of it. I was a little bit too hyper aware to sleep healthfully. But mostly that kind of exploration into those kinds of sonic spaces are in my wheelhouse. I don’t really find them terror in them, though I know that they do that to other people, But I’m quite joyfully in them. 

What was it like to be part of Richard Stanley’s long-awaited return to feature filmmaking?

Color Out of Space stars Nicolas Cage and Joely Richardson with filmmaker Richard Stanley

It was extremely exciting. I reached out to the producers immediately and began talks with them. I’d never seen the infamous documentary about Richard trying to make “Island of Lost Souls,” and purposefully avoided watching it because I didn’t want to have any preconceptions about the man. I just wanted to have a conversation with him about what we might do together. I’m very glad that I did because my time with Richard was truly a pleasure. He is such a sweetheart. He is brilliant, and he’s never boring. He has big ideas and an incredible intellect to convey them. It was a lot of fun getting into character with him. Where I’d been talking with Where I wrote the score for “Hereditary” from the script and gave music to the set that Ari would play for the cast, the process of “Color” was immediate. I wrote a few of the major themes and sonic concepts and we were rolling. The music was finished in under two months.  

(photo by Jonathan Durand)

Were you familiar at all with the literature or the cinematic universe of HP Lovecraft before taking this on? 

I was a big Dungeons and Dragons nerd and metal head when I was a kid. Being in that scene, you can’t not have been influenced by his imagining. His creature design is everywhere in all of that. You either peripherally or verbatim know about Lovecraft’s stories. I certainly would not ever claim to be anywhere near Richard’s familiarity with his work. His mother’s favorite stories which she’d read to him as bedtime stories when he was a kid. I had no upbringing like that!    

What was your collaboration like with Richard?  

The first thing I had read from Richard was him posing the question of what the sound of cosmic life form that manifests itself as a spectrum of light that does not exist in our reality would sound like? I love big, ridiculous questions like that. My partner at the time had been reading Liu Cixin’s “The Three-Body Problem” trilogy and brought up the idea of there being “density.” A common trope of mine is the exploration of hyper tense melodic, harmonic and rhythmic spaces in music. This just seemed like a perfect opportunity to go hog wild and run fast and far in that direction. So the concept at first was taking the underwater recorded sounds of coral reefs and layering them on one another to create this ultra-dense, cacophonous rhythmic space and then running that through various harmonic generators. Then I’d combine that with other extended techniques on conventional instruments, played unconventionally. That created the basis for what became the sound of the “color.” I think the task like that was to come up with something that was incredibly abstract and representative of the cosmic element, while at the same time  coming up with themes, an aesthetic and a tone that could play the idyllic and the quaint that was in the story, and the character of Gardener family, and then a kind of “Jaws”-level refrain that would be the musical element that would merge the two. So the first three things that I came up with was the theme for the Gardeners, what would eventually become the penultimate scene in the movie and its track “The Color” and the refrain that’s I the track called “Contact” which you hear with the falling of the meteorite.  

(photo by Jonathan Durand)


What’s the challenge of musically merging the two genres of science fiction and horror? 

I never really looked at it that way to be totally honest. Like I said, if, if I started thinking about the “genre,” then I that I’m doing a huge disservice to the whatever score I’m working on. If what I’m doing starts sounding like something that somebody else did for another horror film, then I feel like I’m doing something wrong. I don’t want to be derivative of a genre. One of the main puzzles to be solved in creating a character and a narrative arc musically for this score specifically was to have a feeling of otherworldliness, a sense of complete and utter alien tone that would be the undoing of the, the flip side of the coin, which is this very, very quaint, pastoral, incredibly conventional and melancholic, theme for this family that is upended throughout the course of the film. So if we know where the music is starting and ending, what do each of, what is the role of each of those themes in getting us there? For me, that’s the most fun part of the challenge of finding the very particular ways in which a film wants to be, as, puzzled out musically – to try and steer clear of the “genre” tropes.  

Watching the film is like being on an acid trip that’s both beautiful and horrifying at the same time. How did you want to kind of capture that hallucinogenic descent into madness? 

I felt that I had to be very unpredictable. I wanted the music to lead without pointing, as I would put it. When I did “Hereditary,” I was specifically tasking myself with the challenge of trying to “couch” the music in some way so that it was so that its true nature was hiding in plain sight. Everything there is just a very conventional instrument, but not in the way that they’re played or manipulated. Their identities had been obscured through different techniques and processes. There’s certainly that here. But I’d say that “Color” went a step further and is adding elements to it, like what is literally happening in the film. It’s polluting on this foundational level. 

(photo by Jonathan Durand)

For example, take the very first scene when Ward is doing the voiceover as we see this spacious, haunting forest. The primary melodic and harmonic mover there is actually a recording of a bull elk that is in the rut and screaming. I took that, floated it down with a modified pitch and ran it through processing to have it become this kind of adulterated, cosmic deformation of its original nature. So that was the big step. How do we take the inherent nature in all of this and twist it sufficiently so that it becomes something that is no longer recognizable? But if you’re told that used to be a cat, or used to be a person, like, um, you can see, you can see it’s, it’s the foundation then you can see the music’s roots. That’s what this score was all about for me. It was starting from something that was natural and then seeing how far things could be twisted, all while remaining as unpredictable as possible with regard to the movement and, the overall sonic structure of things. If your intended goal is a hallucinatory world, then you have to be more or less like what it is like to be in a state of hallucination, which for those of us who have spent periods of time in those states is one where even the absolute mundane and every day is made completely new, shiny and alien. So there was an absolute ton of sounds that I started with that eventually became “non-musical” sounds that became part of the backbone to music. And the first one is the terrifying suck-scream of the bull elk. 

Did you ever, did you ever feel you got to “out there” or musically insane at points? 

(photo by Jonathan Durand)

On that score? No! (laughs). The key to it was to never second guess how crazy it was getting because most people are not that crazy. Most people are used to things to be being quite run of the mill, whatever that mill is for that day on hand. I like to not really be influenced by the outside, especially when I’m working on something like this. I like to isolate myself from things and to make sure that if something gets crazy and I think that maybe it’s getting a little too crazy, then I take a step back and revisit it in a day. If I still think it’s too crazy, I’ll try to push it further. And usually that’s the way to go. If something sounds too crazy, chances are you’re just not selling it. And if you, if you push it harder, you can usually sell that “crazy.”

Nicolas cage is once again in his own universe in this movie. What’s it like dealing with that wild “Cage” energy? 

It’s the most fun shit ever. I cannot tell you how many times I just broke down laughing hysterically at not only his performance but then fucking around with music over his performance. It was so much fun. There’s a cue called “Peaches!” which is a very simple track, yet I had the more fun doing it than anything because I got to play it over and over again and hear his lunacy. It’s like what I was saying about keeping on your toes. He’s brilliant. He’s an absolute rarity. There’s nothing quite like him.  

For as absolutely insane as this score gets, it’s actually quite melodic in its madness, especially when compared to “Hereditary.” Do you think that will surprise listeners, who might not otherwise want to hear your previous score outside of its tremendous effectiveness in the movie itself?     

The thrust of all these things is ultimately if it serves the film. Does it serve the narrative? “Hereditary” had to be completely devoid of melodic elements up until the final payoff, because otherwise it detracted and felt conventional. “Color Out of Space” needed these epic themes. It wanted that. It’s a monster movie, which “Hereditary” isn’t. In between these two films I did a series for Hulu called “The First,” where I got to stretch out and do an enormous amount of really big sweeping themes. So people who’ve watched that, and know my solo albums, realize that I don’t shy away from melody. Part of the challenge and distinct pleasure of scoring “Color Out of Space” was that I got to utilize the same sort of heart-pounding, panic inducing elements that I got to utilize with “Hereditary.”  But at the forefront are these big, very recognizable themes was getting to play with their relationship with one another, the relationship to the overall narrative and to show how they also twist and devolve over the course of the film was a lot of fun. So yeah, if people don’t know anything of my work except for “Hereditary,” then this one’s fanfare-ish elements, especially when the shit is hitting the fan, will surprise them. But again, it’s exactly what this film wanted and needed to kind of do itself. 

(photo by Jonathan Durand)

When when you look at composers like yourself, “Under the Skin’s” Mica Levi and “Annihilation’s” Geoff Barrow and Ben Salisbury, do you think you’re creating a meeting of the stylistic minds between sound design and music. I mean that’s becoming a new, experimental normal for film scoring?

When we go to the movies, we still see the majority of films being scored very conventionally. But there are elements of non-conventionality coming in. Right now, it is quite a fad in the industry, and everyone loves to chase the next hot thing in the industry. I see it as a welcome door opening – but not that if we’re lucky everything is just going to be a chaotic mass of just drones and chaotic sounds. I certainly don’t believe that film scoring is just about turning the whole notion of the score into sound design. But I am very happy that more and more people are recognizing that there is much, much more than what they previously accepted that can, and should be defined under the umbrella of the term “music.” Music should simply be the sonic element that we utilize to affect an emotional response in one another. That can be a lot of different things. For me, it doesn’t really matter if it’s weird, so long as it’s doing its job. If it’s just a weird sound. It’s just a weird sound. If it’s a beautiful, very conventional tone, a melody or chord and it’s doing its job, then it’s doing its job. It doesn’t have to be weird. It doesn’t have to be a “strangeness.” Nothing has to pass to be imbued with a strangeness in order to make it effective. But there are myriad ways of being effective at conveying those intentions and emotions. So I’m happy that people seem to be starting to really open up to the world of possibilities in film scoring. 

“Color out of Space” is now in theaters and VOD, and on home video February 25th HERE

Listen to Colin Stetson’s score on Milan Records February 7th HERE, and “Hereditary” HERE

Visit Colin Stetson’s website HERE

Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: 'A Star Is Born' & 'Chernobyl' Win Film/TV Music Categories at Grammy Awards

Soundtrack News - Ma, 27/01/2020 - 01:00
The 62nd Grammy Awards are being held in Los Angeles today. The nominees and winners in the music categories are as follows: Best Song Written for Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media: "The Ballad of the Lonesome Cowboy" - [m.40665]Toy Story 4[] Songwriter: [c.150]Randy Newman[] "Girl in the Movies" - [m.54057]Dumplin'[] Songwriters: [c.2070]Dolly Parton[] & [c.22850]Linda Perry[] Winner: "I'll Never Love Again (Film Version)" - [m.47155]A Star Is Born[] Songwriters: [c.]Natalie Hemby[], [c.19387]Lady Gaga[], [c.]Hillary Lindsey[] & [c.]Aaron Raitiere[] "Spirit" - [m.49272]The Lion King[] Songwriters: [c.]Beyoncé Knowles-Carter[], [c.]Timothy McKenzie[] & [c.]Ilya Salmanzade[] "Suspirium" - [m.49347]Suspiria[] Songwriter: [c.21756]Thom...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

Interview with Jeff Russo

Film Music Magazine News - Za, 25/01/2020 - 02:23

(photo by Jana Davidoff of Rhapsody PR)

Where Captain James T. Kirk’s original starship boldly went with rousingly thematic melody for “Star Trek,” his successor Jean-Luc Picard explored with a prime directive for muted music when “The Next Generation’s” Enterprise-D took flight decades later. But if this new “Trek” and the spin-offs that followed were commanded to tread lightly, leave it to a new leap for the galaxy of subscription TV to truly bring memorable scoring back to the franchise with “Discovery.” Piloting this work through Klingon war, A.I. menace and a mind-boggling propulsion stream through two seasons and counting has been Jeff Russo. A composer with seemingly infinite stylistic voyages into the small-screen medium with the likes of “CSI: Cyber,” “American Gothic,” “Waco,” “Santa Clarita Diet,” “Legion” and “Lucifer,” the passion of a career inspired by “Trek’s” tunefully unabashed soundtracks were more than heard in the sweepingly orchestral sound he brought to the show’s third lifespan – one that now splinters back to the future with “Picard.”

Where fans last saw a vital Captain given a new life by Data’s sacrifice at the end of 2002’s feature “Nemesis” we now catch up with a character far more reminiscent of star Patrick Stewart’s life-beaten turn as Professor Xavier in “Logan” – even if this former leader is far more in control of his senses. Put to vineyard pasture after walking from Starfleet due to a thwarted Romulan exodus and the banning of artificial life after a Mars terrorist attack, Picard finds a new spark upon being contacted by Dahj (Isa Briones). As a woman who holds Data’s legacy, it will be the quest to find her origins that will drive the first season of “Picard,” one that will have Picard encounter both new, and familiar faces in a re-energized Next Generation universe .

Where Russo’s work for “Discovery” took a more cosmic, and overt emotional viewpoint given its tonal shifts from the fury of battle to saving the universe itself among episodes of sacrifice and rebirth, “Picard” shifts warp to a far more introspective tone. It’s not that thrill of new adventure, or the instantly nostalgic call of iconic themes abound. But what’s most daring about Russo’s approach here is in fitting a still-commanding presence into civilian cloths of a man who’s now full of self-doubt about his place in the universe, and the good he might have done for it. It’s an insightful, lyrical approach that brings a new, movingly soulful voice to the often epic sound of the “Star Trek,” all while continuing Russo’s fresh, enthusiastic vibrancy for the shows that spring from sci-fi TV’s most famed show in a medium thirsting for content.

Pictured: Sir Patrick Stewart as Jean-Luc Picard of the CBS All Access series STAR TREK: PICARD. Photo Cr: Justin Lubin/CBS ©2019 CBS Interactive, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Of course, “Picard” is far from alone in Russo’s galaxy. Soon on his heels will be new adventures with the dysfunctional grown-up superheroes of “The Umbrella Academy” a re-spawn into the future noir of “Altered Carbon” (premiering February 27th) and a return to his Emmy-winning work on “Fargo” (premiering April 19th), which takes its most unpredictable, fatalistically eccentric trip to a race gangster war in 1950 Kansas City. All will reveal new voices in Russo’s repertoire, with each soundtrack distinguished by his singular quality in exploring characters with music that can be as cosmic as it is intimate.

Was it always a given that you’d be scoring “Picard?”

Star Trek producer Alex Kurtzman

Nothing in this business is ever given, so I don’t ever take anything like that for granted. I was at the Star Trek convention in Las Vegas where they announced the series. I was backstage with a bunch of people. Our Alex Kurtzman, the architect of the entire television Star Trek television world walked in and then Patrick Stewart walked in. I looked at Alex and I asked him what was happening. He told me to come out into the audience to watch. Then they announced the show was happening. I told Alex that The Next Generation was where I began my Star Trek fandom. That was my generation, and I had to do this show! He told me we’d talk about it. Eventually he called me and told me that he really wanted me to do the show, especially because of what he thought my music brought to the Star Trek franchise. But it was all an ongoing conversation, and never a foregone conclusion. I didn’t have to audition for it because my demo for them was my work on seasons one and two of “Star Trek: Discovery”

I did a number of versions of a main title theme. The melody basically stayed the same throughout the different iterations. One was a big sort of more swashbuckling thing, one sounded like a “space” show and one was a darker and more contemplative version. The one we ended up with was a more emotional and stirring take on a melodic theme for Picard.


How did the DNA-like visuals of the opening titles influence your scoring?

I had actually written the main title before there was ever a visual of it. They took the music I’d written and started building a title sequence around it. Then they sent me back the visuals which I then tailored my music around. Certain flourishes needed to be move around and certain passages needed to be repeated. So it was sort of a hand off that went back and forth. It wasn’t like “Here’s the visuals, now write a piece of music for it.”

Pictured: Sir Patrick Stewart as Jean-Luc Picard of the CBS All Access series STAR TREK: PICARD. Photo Cr: Matt Kennedy/CBS ©2019 CBS Interactive, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Now what’s really into, how would you describe the energy of this show being different than “Discovery’s?”

This is a really different show. This is a humanistic approach to telling the story of someone who wants to make amends to himself. Picard had this break with Starfleet because of their differences of opinion on The Romulans and an artificial human attack on Mars. That’s why he ended up leaving Starfleet. Now Picard wants to get to the bottom of the whole thing. So this isn’t a show about outward exploration. It’s about his inward exploration. It’s a more of a personal story really talking about his journey as opposed to a group of people’s.

Pictured (l-r): Harry Treadaway as Narek; Isa Briones of the CBS All Access series STAR TREK: PICARD. Photo Cr: Trae Patton/CBS ©2019 CBS Interactive, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Given that intimate approach, do you think that “Picard” highlights solo instruments more than “Discovery” does?

I wanted to take a more personalized approach, certainly for the first episode. I felt it would benefit from solo passages. There’s flute, because, I’m taking a lead from The Next Generation’s episode “The Inner Light” where Picard learned to play the Ressikan flute. So that seemed like a natural instrument to use. I tend to use cello a lot because it tells an emotional story that fills that same harmonic space as the human voice does. Then there’s some more sort of esoteric instruments used to give voice to certain characters in the following episodes.

Where the music of The Next Generation’s era had an amorphous approach, you’ve taken a much more forthrightly musical approach to your scoring of the new Star Trek. How difficult is to bring that non-obtrusive approach to Picard to make us recall his character’s past?

Pictured (l-r): Patrick Stewart as Picard; Michelle Hurd as Raffi of the the CBS All Access series STAR TREK: PICARD. Photo Cr: Trae Patton/CBS ©2019 CBS Interactive, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

The challenge is trying to figure out how to not utilize too much music. I think that what is interesting is that there’s probably more music in those TNG seasons then you remember. Those show’s directive was that they didn’t want the audience to know there was music there, even though they needed it. They needed something to help with the story, but they wanted music just to be wallpaper. That was the sort of directive that I’ve read about. I don’t tend to write music as just sort of wallpaper. If I’m writing something, then there’s usually some sort of melodic construction that is going to help tell the story. I rely on my own instinct to guide me with that.

I’m very aware of the, of the musical “cannon” of Star Trek, going back to the all of the series and all the films, except “Enterprise” which I didn’t see. I don’t really think of one approach versus the other in terms of Star Trek music then and now. Though I was a huge Next Generation fan, my true entryway into Star Trek was with “The Wrath of Khan.” It’s score by James Horner’s was very musical and also extremely atonal as well. There was a lot of both in that movie. That was the Star Trek music that I knew and loved. So I sort of take my lead in terms of the musical cannon from the films more than the television shows. Obviously, the original series has really interesting music that if you listen to it now, sounds kind of campy. But back then it was groundbreaking. I feel like that’s the way these stories were meant to be told now. So, in thinking about how to relate music to a character, with Jean-Luc Picard especially, it was really important to me to have there be a musical stamp on him – and have it not necessarily be what I’d done for “Discovery.” This show has a completely different feeling than it. So my challenge was how I could keep “Picard’s” music in the world of Star Trek while also making it sound different? I’m facing it even now as I’m writing for the series.

Pictured (l-r): Evan Evagora as Elnor; Patrick Stewart as Picard of the the CBS All Access series STAR TREK: PICARD. Photo Cr: Trae Patton/CBS ©2019 CBS Interactive, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

The first episode has a chase sequence that makes it clear that Picard isn’t going to be an action-oriented character running at top speed. How did his age weigh into the score?

I don’t really think about that consciously, but I think there’s a subconscious level of having to dig deeper into a musicality for him because there’s this experience, depth of character and gravitas to him. But you’re right. Patrick Stewart is playing a character that is past his physical prime. I think that if we were to try to play him where he has this ability to make those moves musically, it would feel disingenuous. I feel like it’s more about his presence in any situation that guides my musical direction.

Could you talk about Picard’s father-daughter like relationship with Dahj?

Pictured: Isa Briones of the CBS All Access series STAR TREK: PICARD. Photo Cr: James Dimmock/CBS ©2019 CBS Interactive, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

She becomes the jumping off point for his quest through the series. His relationship to her is a a direct result of his relationship with Data. Because somewhere deep inside he feels responsible for Data’s sacrifice he feels duty bound to figure out the mystery of Dahj and how she’s connected to Data. Generally speaking, this kind of relationship makes this series more emotional than other Star Treks series because they haven’t really told a story as personal as this one.

How did you want to impactfully bring in Jerry Goldsmith’s “Next Generation” theme which now signifies Picard and his Enterprise, even though it was originally written for “Star Trek: The Motion Picture?”

(photo by Jana Davidoff of Rhapsody PR)

I think it was a great idea when that became the TV theme for The Next Generation. I’m able to utilize cannon thematic material in order to affect a certain emotional feeling. At the moment that I use it in episode one, it’s Picard, and it really does connect everything. The great thing about music is that you really can bring somebody from point A to point B on the turn of a dime with something as iconic as a theme like that. In the same way I can use Alexander Courage’s theme to evoke the idea of Star Trek in general. So I can connect the dots between Picard and The Next Generation. It’s not technically necessary, but it’s great to be able to pull on those heartstrings. God, it’s one of my favorite melodies that Goldsmith ever wrote. It’s very easy for me to be writing a cue and then, say, “Oh, wouldn’t it be nice to just go “Bah-da-da-da-da-da-daa!” That tends to work, but I don’t ever want to overuse it, you know, just like I didn’t want to overuse Sandy Courage’s fanfare on “Discovery,” Yet, it is nice to know that the entirety of Star Trek’s musical cannon of the entire franchise can be used anywhere to tie it all together. It’s like how I could utilize the “Discovery” season one themes later in season two. It really does tie the whole thing together. But I don’t do use “Discovery” themes in “Picard,” because they are two separate things. But you never know.

When Picard does join his “crew” as such, you bring in some instruments like the guitar which we really haven’t heard on “Discovery.” How is it to jump into those new styles with “Picard?”

Pictured (l-r): Sir Patrick Stewart as Jean-Luc Picard; Jonathan Del Arco as Hugh of the CBS All Access series STAR TREK: PICARD. Photo Cr: Matt Kennedy/CBS ©2019 CBS Interactive, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Again, it’s like trying to give a little bit of a different flavor to the feeling of this show’s score and adding different things to it like a guitar, or voices for that matter, in order to effect a change – yet still trying to keep it all in the same sort of feeling. I did use the guitar on “Discover,” although it was kind of hidden. I use all the tools at my disposal. It wasn’t necessarily about me saying, “Oh, I’ll use the guitar for this character or voices for this character.” It was really just trying to utilize a different flavor in order to affect something different. I like my ability to be able to do that in this particular show because “Picard’s” storytelling is so different than “Discovery’s.”

Let’s talk about the upcoming season four of “Fargo,” which relocates to Kansas City in the 1950 for a war between black and white gangsters.

“Fargo” is something brand new every time. Every time we start a new season, I get to sit in a playground and basically just have fun. That’s one of the greatest gifts I’ve ever gotten from Noah Hawley is the ability to take what he’s asking for and throw off the entire pallet on the table and sort of just pick and choose the kinds of things I wanna I really want to do. He has a very specific direction and a very specific way he likes to do things and feel that he wants. A lot of it is throwing out the old and figuring out what the new thing is. In doing that over the last like six months on this season I’ve been having a lot of fun. I can’t really explain to you what the palette is for season four. There’s a little bit of everything and then of course there’s a very “Fargo” feeling to the score. because that’s, that’s what we’re doing. So there’s always a little bit of drums, there’s drama, big horns and a big orchestra playing these very dark emotional pieces. Then there’s a lot of fun as well. You’ll hear that in the first episode for sure,

Whether it’s the 60’s or the present day, your scoring has always reflected the time of the particular season. So given the 50’s, what can we musically expect for that period?

I think a lot of that is going to be in the rhythm and my use of brass, versus how I used it in season three. A lot of times we utilize songs to really put us in the place, and I think that we’ll be doing a lot of that for season four. You’ll definitely hear a lot of source that will put you right in that time period. I love scoring period pieces simply because they look so great, feel so great. Yet I’m not trying to make the score sound like it’s from the 50’s, because that would be disingenuous for me. I’m making a “Fargo” score, so the question is how do I thread that into the fact that this is a period piece. I’m not trying to make it sound old, but yet we are trying to tip our hat to that, so to speak.

You also did a beautiful, hypnotic score for Noah’s feature film “Lucy in the Sky,” which you could say is another science “fiction” piece about a flawed space voyager.

I think I’d call it “science drama.” It’s a human story, and there wasn’t a lot of science involved except for the fact that she’s an astronaut. It’s really about telling Lucy’s story. I would have been a lot happier if more people had gotten to see it. I’m super proud of the movie and super proud of the store. I think that people either understood it or they didn’t. That’s just the sort of way things happened

It’s also quite meta, now that Noah is set to do the new “Star Trek” movie, which means you could likely end up doing a whole other iteration of its music given that he wants a new crew.

Noah Hawley

I’m extremely excited about that possibility. We have had conversations about it. But again, nothing is ever a foregone conclusion in my mind. I cherish my work with Noah. I think that he has an incredibly, incredibly interesting story to tell with his version of “Star Trek. I think people will love it. But that’s only one person’s opinion who happens to write music. II hope that it works out like that.

What’s in store for your second season at Netflix’s “The Umbrella Academy,” even if it looks like the earth has been destroyed?

I can tell you that the kids are all alive and well. Season two does pick up where season one left off, which means that basically you don’t know where the hell they are or where they ended up. The thing that you can expect the most from season two is the same as you got from season one, which is a whole lot of fun and interesting stuff between the characters. For me, the best part about the show is the human aspect of it – the fact that all, all the kids, including the dead one, are flawed in a very human way despite their superhuman abilities. I really enjoy working on a project that allows that kind of latitude. I’m not writing “superhero” themes. I’m writing grounded and emotional music.

In the second season of Netflix’s “Altered Carbon,” you’ll have Anthony Mackie taking over the human “sleeve.” How will that affect your scoring for it?

For the second season of “Altered Carbon” I’m collaborating with Jordan Gagne, who used to be my assistant. I also collaborated with him on “Treadstone.” “Altered Carbon” is going to be even more insane as it deals with the rest of the story, and how the characters are dealing with their world. You get a little more into the history of how the whole thing began with the uploading of the consciousness to these chips and what it means to the people now. The show is really sort of an allegory for our time, except here the super wealthy are able to live forever while the people below them are not.

You’ve used a lot of surreal textures on “Altered Carbon” that’s very different than what you apply to the future of “Star Trek,” while complement “Carbon’s” “Blade Runner”-like atmosphere.

The one thing we didn’t want to do was make a score that felt like “Blade Runner” for season one because the show had a futuristic look of the same caliber. So as opposed to doing a completely synth score, we had an orchestral element that took it away from that, something that we continue in the new season. We have an unearthly-sounding piano and very effected strings in conjunction with some electronic stuff to give the score its own identity.

With Apple TV’s “For All Mankind,” you’ve scored a “real” approach to an alternate future where the Russians win the space race.

When they told me about the show, it was appealing to me on a number of levels. But beyond the Russians getting to the moon first, it really does dig into the whole sexism and racism of the time. I always tend to like to write music for projects that rely on emotional content in order to tell a story, not just action for action’s sake. Again, here was a human story that really interested me.

Now that “Star Trek: Discovery” has jetted ahead far into the future for its third season, what will that time period’s affect be on your score?

To be honest with you, I’ve absolutely no idea. The reason I say that is because I’ve only watched very few scenes in the process of doing some pre-recorded music for the show. I’ve read some scripts though. But I can’t imagine that my approach will be significantly different because we’re not changing the show. We’re just changing the timeframe under which they’re telling the story. The last thing I’m going to try is to sound even more futuristic because now we’re a thousand years past the future anyway. Season one had a darker take on the time, while season two had more of a swashbuckling energy. Now they think they’ve prevailed over evil and have made it away. But I’m sure that what awaits them there is another obstacle that they’ll need to overcome. And the music will definitely help tell that story.

Given how prolific you are, how do you maintain that quality with show after show?

I am a stickler for, for quality. If it’s not great, then why are we doing it? If it’s, it’s not great, give it up. I don’t let anything go. I have a small and very agile team of people who are with me every step of the way, triple, quadruple and quintuple checking everything so that it can be as good as it can be. That goes from my orchestrator to my assistants, my mixer, recording engineer and music editors. That’s especially important with “Star Trek” as we take it from spotting to the scoring stage and finally have it aired. It goes through so many iterations. There’s writing, mocking up, orchestrating, recording and mixing. There are so many things that have to happen before we’re able to get to the finish line. Every step of the way and needs to, needs to be great. If it’s not, everything grinds to a halt. I don’t know about how anybody else does it. But if it doesn’t sound great, then you’re failing, and I don’t want to fail in that way. I just want to do my best. That’s the ideology that I run everything by.

Many people will quite a given streaming service when their favorite show ends its season, and then sign back on when it returns. Given that, it now appears that CBS will eventually have any given “Star Trek” show running continuously so they don’t lose viewers. How would you be able to keep up with that given how busy you are?

(photo by Jana Davidoff of Rhapsody PR)

I’ve actually had that conversation with Alex Kurtzman, which was the main reason why I told him that I couldn’t do all of the Star Trek shorts this year. There was just literally not enough time for me to do them because they were all literally falling on top of my work for “Picard.” I was like, “If you want me to do one, then I can do one. But where’s this time going to come for me to do the rest of them?” So were brought in other composers, which I thought was a really great idea for the “Star Trek” shorts. But for the last one “Children of Mars,” Alex was very keen on me doing it because it ties into “Picard.” In terms of other “Star Trek” shows like “Section 31” or “Lower Decks” going on, if it’s not sort of staggered, then it might not be possible for me to do everything. I might have to oversee some, if that’s what they want. So I’m not sure exactly what’s going to happen when. Again, I always come back to nothing is ever a foregone conclusion.

How do you hope your musical legacy stands among the “canon” of “Star Trek” music?

I just try to bring honesty to my work. I try to be for real and helps tell the story in a grounded way. I don’t ever want to lead an audience around, even though sometimes I’m asked to do that. I think that the way we’re telling this particular Star Trek story of “Picard” is different than “Discovery,” which is very interesting to me. I think that we’ve tried to tell an honest story for him. That’s the thing that will always connect with an audience for me. If you try to tell the story with music the same way that a writer tries to tell the story with dialogue, then that’s usually a winning combination. I think that’s what we’re bringing to this new telling of Star Trek.

Watch “Picard” on CBS All Access, and listen to Jeff Russo’s Star Trek Discovery scores on Lakeshore Records HERE

Listen to Jeff Russo’s soundtracks HERE

Visit Jeff Russo’s web site HERE

Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Weekly Roundup: January 24

Soundtrack News - Za, 25/01/2020 - 01:00
Announced this week were new composer assignments for [c.1354]Benjamin Wallfisch[] ([m.55693]Mortal Kombat[]), [c.1238]Bear McCreary[] ([m.54333]Fantasy Island[]) and [c.564]Christophe Beck[] ([m.56195]WandaVision[]), among many others. For the full list of composer and music supervisor assignments from this week, [url./composers/]click here[]. Over 35 new soundtrack albums were released this week. [da.2020-01-21]Click here for the full schedule[]. Opening in theaters nationwide this week are (with music by): [m.55385]The Gentlemen[] ([c.21088]Christopher Benstead[]), [m.48885]The Last Full Measure[] ([c.15505]Philip Klein[]) and [m.52486]The Turning[] ([c.810]Nathan Barr[]). We are tracking song credits for the following new theatrical releases: -[m.55385]The...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Sony Music Announces 'Bad Boys for Life' Score Album

Soundtrack News - Vr, 24/01/2020 - 01:00
Sony Music releases [a.27515]Bad Boys for Life (Original Motion Picture Score)[] with music by Grammy Award-winning, Emmy- and BAFTA-nominated composer [c.1465]Lorne Balfe[]. Available everywhere tomorrow, the album features score music written by Balfe for the third and final installment in Sony Pictures' [m.1721]Bad Boys[] trilogy starring Will Smith and Martin Lawrence, in theaters everywhere now. Of the score, composer [c.1465]Lorne Balfe[] says, "Adil El Arbi and Bilall Fallah are the future of film making. Working with them and Jerry Bruckheimer have been an amazing experience. Having been a fan of the original [m.]Bad Boys[], it was an honor to be part of the...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Milan Records to Release 'The Witcher' Soundtrack

Soundtrack News - Do, 23/01/2020 - 01:00
Milan Records announces the January 24 release of [a.27506]The Witcher (Music from the Netflix Original Series)[] by composer and award-winning pianist [c.23015]Sonya Belousova[] and critically-acclaimed composer [c.9898]Giona Ostinelli[]. Available for preorder now, the album features music written by the duo for Netflix's latest fantasy drama series. Also included on the soundtrack and out today is the now-viral hit "Toss A Coin To Your Witcher," a medieval ballad that has garnered unanimous critical acclaim from NPR, CNN, Vulture, BuzzFeed, Refinery29, Esquire and more, in addition to inspiring countless covers and remixes from fans. Based on the best-selling novel by Andrzej Sapkowski, [m.57340]The Witcher[] made its season one...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Weekly Roundup: January 17

Soundtrack News - Za, 18/01/2020 - 01:00
Academy Award Nominations were announced this week honoring the best achievements in motion pictures in 2019 -- including the Original Score and Original Song categories. For the list of music-related nominations, [url./news/article/?id=2917]click here[]. Announced this week were new composer assignments for [c.752]Alexandre Desplat[] ([m.56201]Black Widow[]), [c.1480]Henry Jackman[] ([m.57508]Cherry[]) and [c.45]John Debney[] ([m.54942]I Still Believe[]), among many others. For the full list of composer and music supervisor assignments from this week, [url./composers/]click here[]. Over 25 new soundtrack albums were released this week. [da.2020-01-14]Click here for the full schedule[]. Opening in theaters nationwide this week are (with music by):...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: 92nd Academy Awards Nominations Announced

Soundtrack News - Di, 14/01/2020 - 01:00

This morning, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced the nominations for [t.57487]The 92nd Academy Awards[]. The nominees are as follows:

Best Original Score
[m.53148]Joker[], [c.7675]Hildur Gudnadottir[]
[m.53146]Little Women[], [c.752]Alexandre Desplat[]
[m.56170]Marriage Story[], [c.150]Randy Newman[]
[m.54413]1917[], [c.149]Thomas Newman[]
[m.38439]Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker[], [c.231]John Williams[]

Best Original Song
"I Can't Let You Throw Yourself Away" from [m.40665]Toy Story 4[], Music and Lyric by [c.150]Randy Newman[]
"(I'm Gonna) Love Me Again" from [m.52669]Rocketman[], Music by [c.610]Elton John[]; Lyric by [c.2371]Bernie Taupin[]
"I'm Standing With You" from...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Fox Music/Hollywood Records Announce 'Underwater' Soundtrack

Soundtrack News - Za, 11/01/2020 - 01:00
Fox Music/Hollywood Records releases the digital original motion picture soundtrack to 20th Century Fox's [m.52471]Underwater[], directed by William Eubank today. [c.14]Marco Beltrami[] and [c.3355]Brandon Roberts[] composed and conducted the music for [m.52471]Underwater[], which was recorded at Pianella Studios in Malibu. The [m.52471]Underwater[] score album is available today at digital service providers, as the film opens in U.S. theatres.      Beltrami and Roberts have collaborated on numerous projects since 2013 including [m.40705]Logan[], [m.33298]The Wolverine[], [m.32331]Warm Bodies[] and [m.32675]World War Z[]. The duo received an Emmy Award in the Outstanding Music Composition for a Documentary Series or Special category...

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NEWS: 10th Annual Guild of Music Supervisors Awards Nominations Announced

Soundtrack News - Vr, 10/01/2020 - 01:00
The Guild of Music Supervisors announced today the nominees of their landmark 10th annual award ceremony celebrating outstanding achievement in the craft of Music Supervision in movies, television, games, advertising, and trailers. Crowning the evening will be this year's Icon Award honoree composer and lyricist [c.9]Burt Bacharach[]. Bacharach will join industry legend Bob Hunka who will receive the organization's prestigious Legacy Award. Bacharach and Hunka will receive their honors at the 10th Annual Guild of Music Supervisors Awards taking place on Wednesday, February 6th at The Wiltern Theater in Los Angeles. Here are the nominations in the major categories: BEST MUSIC SUPERVISION FOR FILM: BUDGETED OVER 25 MILLION DOLLARS [c.4106]Mary Ramos[] - [m.51210]Once Upon A Time In...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: BAFTA Nominations Announced

Soundtrack News - Wo, 08/01/2020 - 01:00

The nominations for the 73rd British Academy Film Awards were announced today. The nominees in the film music related category are as follows:

Original Score:
[m.54413]1917[] - [c.149]Thomas Newman[]
[m.55572]Jojo Rabbit[] - [c.534]Michael Giacchino[]
[m.53148]Joker[] - [c.7675]Hildur Gudnadottir[]
[m.53146]Little Women[] - [c.752]Alexandre Desplat[]
[m.38439]Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker[] - [c.231]John Williams[]

The British Academy Film Awards will be given out on February 2, 2020. For further details on all of the nominees in each category, visit...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Hildur Gudnadottir, Elton John & Bernie Taupin Win Golden Globes

Soundtrack News - Ma, 06/01/2020 - 01:00

Earlier tonight, the 77th Golden Globe Awards ceremony was held at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, CA. The nominees and winners in the music categories were as follows:

Best Original Score - Motion Picture:
[m.53146]Little Women[] - [c.752]Alexandre Desplat[]
Winner: [m.53148]Joker[] - [c.7675]Hildur Gudnadottir[]
[m.56170]Marriage Story[] - [c.150]Randy Newman[]
[m.54413]1917[] - [c.149]Thomas Newman[]
[m.54695]Motherless Brooklyn[] - [c.1318]Daniel Pemberton[]

Best Orginal Song - Motion Picture:
"Beautiful Ghosts" - [m.53473]Cats[] Songwriters: [c.1092]Andrew Lloyd Webber[], [c.]Taylor Swift[]
Winner: "I'm Gonna Love Me Again" - [m.52669]Rocketman[] Songwriters: [c.610]Elton John[], [c.2371]Bernie...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Weekly Roundup: January 3

Soundtrack News - Za, 04/01/2020 - 01:00
Announced this week were new composer assignments for [c.534]Michael Giacchino[] ([m.57437]Let Him Go[]), [c.452]Theodore Shapiro[] ([m.57436]The Good House[]) and [c.365]George S. Clinton[] & [c.29234]Amit May Cohen[] ([m.57429]Zombies 2[]), among many others. For the full list of composer and music supervisor assignments from this week, [url./composers/]click here[]. 4 new soundtrack albums were released this week. [da.2019-12-31]Click here for the full schedule[]. Opening in theaters nationwide this week is (with music by): [m.52233]The Grudge[] ([c.1742]The Newton Brothers[]). We are tracking song credits for the following new theatrical releases: -[m.52233]The Grudge[] (3 songs) The following composers are celebrating their birthdays within the next...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws

NEWS: Weekly Roundup: December 27

Soundtrack News - Za, 28/12/2019 - 01:00
Announced this week were new composer assignments for [c.1745]Trent Reznor[] & [c.1283]Atticus Ross[] ([m.57397]Mank[]), [c.237]Hans Zimmer[] & [c.5194]Ron Howard[] ([m.57400]Rebuilding Paradise[]) and [c.2590]Dan Romer[] ([m.56254]Wendy[]), among many others. For the full list of composer and music supervisor assignments from this week, [url./composers/]click here[]. Over 15 soundtrack albums were released this week. [da.2019-12-24]Click here for the full schedule[]. Opening in theaters nationwide this week are (with music by): [m.53146]Little Women[] ([c.752]Alexandre Desplat[]) and [m.46768]Spies in Disguise[] ([c.452]Theodore Shapiro[]). Expanding nationwide from its limited release earlier this month is [m.56189]Uncut Gems[] ([c.8032]Daniel Lopatin[]). We are...

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Categorieën: Filmmuziek nieuws
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